The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Eighteenth-Century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Eighteenth-Century found 296 posts

Fake News of the Surrender of Quebec: A Video Contribution

In 1776, the Pennsylvania Evening Post printed a letter, allegedly from Paris, which reported that American commander Benedict Arnold had captured the last major British... The post Fake News of the Surrender of Quebec: A Video Contribution appeared...

‘A la manière de Voltaire’ – contrefaçons et découvertes

La Henriade (Londres, 1741), page de titre. (BnF) On ne prête qu’aux riches. Ce proverbe chaque jour vérifié éclaire les origines du volume le plus étonnant de la collection des Œuvres complètes de...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Jan 2021

Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?

This month, we asked our contributors: With many different holidays and celebrations approaching, what is your favorite beverage known to have been consumed during... The post Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?...

Jacques Pierre Brissot and Charles Burney: unpublished letters reveal a dance to society’s music

Charles Burney, by Joshua Reynolds. (National Portrait Gallery) Charles Burney (1726-1814), eminent music historian and man of letters, son of a musician and dancer, was a central figure in the literary, artistic and musical world of late eighteenth-century...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 10 Dec 2020

Yellow Fever and Church Attendance

John Adams was certain he made a mistake by going to church. Philadelphia’s yellow fever outbreak only ended in November 1793. On Sunday, December... The post Yellow Fever and Church Attendance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Comédie-Française by the numbers, 1680-1793

The Comédie-Française in 1790, by Antoine Meunier. (Bibliothèque en ligne Gallica, ARK btv1b10303194d) Almost every evening at the playhouse of the Comédie-Française in Paris from 1680 to 1793, once the curtain had fallen...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Nov 2020

Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch”

Although it may not have been fatal, scabies brought more patients to British Army hospitals during the Seven Years’ War than any other condition,... The post Starting from Scratch: Combating “the Itch” appeared first on Journal of the...

The forces of reproduction. Meta/physics and insect sex in eighteenth-century entomology

In the early modern era, popular opinion on insect reproduction was largely based on the Aristotelian concept of ‘spontaneous generation’. Yet, in the seventeenth century, natural historians began to challenge this longstanding concept, which...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 15 Oct 2020

Discovering Voltaire and Rousseau in song

The Voltaire Foundation is co-sponsoring an event in Oxford next month, ‘Voltaire, Rousseau and the Enlightenment’ – nothing surprising about the title, but for the fact that this event will take place as part of the 2020 Oxford Lieder...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 17 Sep 2020

Contributor Question: A Favorite Witty Quote from the Revolutionary Era

This month we asked our contributors for their favorite witty quote from the era of the American Revolution. The responses are widely varied and... The post Contributor Question: A Favorite Witty Quote from the Revolutionary Era appeared first on Journal...

A publishing challenge – the metamorphosis of a major work

Every project in the Complete Works of Voltaire corpus seems to have its own special features that make it not quite fit into the mould of what has gone before. Our team meetings ring to the sounds of editors wailing ‘But this is different !’...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Aug 2020

Lockdown leisures: how the eighteenth-century Parisian lady would have kept herself busy

François-Hubert Drouais, Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame, 1763-1764. (The National Gallery, London) Removed from the ceremony and allegory of much court portraiture, Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame by François-Hubert Drouais...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Jul 2020

Lessons from an Outbreak: Smallpox in the Hudson Highlands, 1781

On January 20, 1781, near New Windsor in the Hudson Highlands of New York, Dr. Samuel Adams wrote a brief entry in the diary... The post Lessons from an Outbreak: Smallpox in the Hudson Highlands, 1781 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

‘All together now’: accessing national theatre before the internet

Since the spread of global lockdowns to combat coronavirus, there has been an explosion of theatre productions that have been made freely available online. From New York to Delhi, from Cape Town to Rome, people have been able to come together and watch...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 May 2020

Read Daniel Defoe’s Relatable Frustration at Fellow Citizens Failing to Observe ‘Social Distancing’ in ‘A Journal of a Plague Year’ (1722)

As the Covid-19 continues to hold the world in Lockdown much attention has turned to Daniel Defoe’s 1722 text, A Journal of Plague Year. Masquerading as a ‘real’ journal written in 1665, Defoe’s heavily-researched fiction proved...

In memoriam Frank A. Kafker (1931-2020)

Frank A. Kafker (1931-2020). Picture courtesy of the Kafker family. The Voltaire Foundation learned with regret last week of the passing of Professor Frank Arthur Kafker on April 1 due to complications arising from Parkinson’s disease. Kafker figured...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 16 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley on Philadelphia’s Yellow Fever Epidemic

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Brian Patrick O’Malley on the social and medical response to the Yellow Fever epidemic that ravaged... The post This Week on Dispatches: Brian Patrick O’Malley...

The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons

“I often thought that the situation of a people in a bombarded city, was not much worse, and on some accounts not so bad;... The post The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.