The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "George III"

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Your search for posts with tags containing George III found 143 posts

A Video Tour with Bridget Barbara: New York City’s Bowling Green and the Statue of King George III

The bronze Charging Bull sculpture is not the only iconic statue to have stood at the southern tip of Manhattan. In 1770, a large... The post A Video Tour with Bridget Barbara: New York City’s Bowling Green and the Statue of King George III appeared...

Getting to Know George III

From the Historic Royal Palaces we hear that Kew Palace in London will reopen to the vaccinated public on 4 June with a new exhibition: “George III: The Mind Behind the Myth.” As assembled by curator Polly Putnam, this exhibit will reveal facets of...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 May 2021

The British Constitution in Crisis: The Gordon Riots and the American Revolution

By Lauren Michalak In the first week of June 1780, London was nearly brought to its knees by a week-long riot. Rioters destroyed all but one prison, attacked the properties and bodies of judges and politicians, and attempted to sack the Bank of England....
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 May 2021

Tant va la cruche à l’eau qu’enfin elle se brise

“By the efforts of Pitt, who directs Addington, and of a jester wearing cap and bells, an earthenware jug representing George III is lowered into the sea and fatally damaged by striking a rock inscribed ‘Malte’. ‘Addington’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Apr 2021

Ripples from the Boston Tea Party in 1774

Without the Boston Massacre reenactment looming over my schedule this year, I’ll devote the next few days to the events of early March 1774. That was less than three months after the Boston Tea Party, and the ripples from that big splash in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2021

The Persistent Legend of Princess Elizabeth (1770-1840) and the mysterious George Ramus

Well, this certainly was not a proverbial rabbit hole I expected to find myself down when this beautiful portrait caught my eye. I simply wanted to know more about the young lady whose beauty had been captured by George Romney. The portrait is of ‘Elizabeth...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Feb 2021

The Elder Sons of George III: Kings, Princes, and a Grand Old Duke

I'm thrilled to announce that The Elder Sons of George III: Kings, Princes, and a Grand Old Duke, is out now. If you'd like to learn more about the six daughters of the Windsor nunnery, follow the link below to read my guest post at the Pen...

Manuscript Transcription in Your Own Home

This evening at 5:00 P.M., the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture is hosting an online workship titled “Making History thru Handwriting: An Introduction to Manuscript Transcription.”Julie A. Fisher from the American...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jan 2021

Digital Databases to Stay Home For

Here are four digital resources that caught my attention over the past few months. The British Library has digitized George III’s Topographical Library and put the scans on Flickr, each linked back to its own catalogue for full information. There...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Dec 2020

A New Government in Britain in 177

As the year draws to a close, I’m looking back on some of the notable events of 1770 that I didn’t discuss on their Sestercentennial anniversaries. In January 1770, the Duke of Grafton’s government collapsed in London. The duke had become...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2020

The Power of Preserved Iconoclasm

Back in December 2015 I wrote several postings on incorporating the power of iconoclasm—the destruction of images—into historical monuments and commemorations. Those thoughts were provoked by a talk by Wendy Bellion, author of Iconoclasm in...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Sep 2020

There Once Was a Man from Virginia

Yesterday the Journal of the American Revolution observed Independence Day (Observed) by publishing contributors’ limericks about the Declaration of Independence.I had one in that bunch, but I wrote others before choosing which to submit. Since...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jul 2020

The Daughters of George III

I'm thrilled to announce that The Daughters of George III: Sisters and Princesses is available to pre-order now. If you'd like to learn more about the six daughters of the Windsor nunnery, follow the link below to read my guest post at the Pen & Sword...

The Debut of Representative John Adams

The Massachusetts General Court managed to get back to their usual meeting place on 4 June 1770—but only for that one special day.That was King George III’s birthday, a holiday across the British Empire, on the previous week the legislature...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jun 2020

“The Effects of Junius’ Letter”?

Throughout 1769, British politics was roiled by a series of public letters signed “Junius,” attacking the ministry of the Duke of Grafton and promoting William Pitt, by then the Earl of Chatham.The letters combined erudite arguments, apparently...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2020

The Funeral of King George III

King George III died on 29 January 1820 but it was to be a little over two weeks before his funeral took place on February 16, 1820, thus allowing time for everything to be put in place for such a grand event.  The funeral arrangements were made...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Feb 2020

Seeing London with Nathaniel Balch

I’ve long puzzled over why hatter Nathaniel Balch chose to sail to Britain in May 1775, a month after war broke out in Massachusetts. Balch may have been planning the trip for a while for business or personal reasons and just didn’t want to...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Dec 2019

Christmas Presents Fit for Princes and Princesses

A couple of years ago, Robert Paulett at the George Papers Programme shared a list of what the future George III and his siblings received in the Christmas season of 1750-51. Prince George was then twelve years old. He had one older sister and six younger...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2019

British? Or European?: George III’s dinner table and the taste of the nation, 1788-1801

By Rachel Rich and Lisa Smith If we are what we eat, and the king is the father of the nation, then George III’s menus must have something to tell us about who the British people were at the end of the eighteenth century, as Britain moved from early...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2019

The Royal Diets of George III and George IV

Unlike George IV, known for his excesses in all matters, his father was the complete opposite and abstained from any form of excess in the food department, so much so that even the newspapers felt obliged to write about it. George III was a creature...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Oct 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.