The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Hands"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Hands found 24 posts

Hung be the heavens with black! Terry Hands remembered

Hung be the heavens with black, yield day to night! Terry Hands The opening line of Henry VI Part One seems appropriate as a memorial for the great theatre director Terry Hands, who died on 4 February 2020. The success of the Royal Shakespeare Company...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 5 Feb 2020

How to Interpret Small Hands, 1651

John Bulwer, Chirologia (1644), Folger Shakespeare Library "The hands very short, doth signifie a gross and rude person: fat and fleshie, with the finger likewise, inclined to theft. Small hands, crafty men."  Johannes ab Indagine, The Book of...
From: Ask the Past on 12 Jan 2017

Colloque : « The Art Market, Collectors and Agents : Then and Now » (Paris, 20-21 octobre 2016)

The focus of the conference is to explore the changing and complex nature of the role of agent in the art market during the Modern Period. Papers will explore shifts in the dynamics of the market, the changing taste of collectors and the importance of...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 18 Oct 2016

October Blogroll: Theatre in the Grove

Dear readers, I find myself in the fortunate circumstance of find my new university offers more local theatre than I can hardly manage to fit into my schedule. A number of events are being put on as an a means to meditate on the recent violence in our...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 2 Oct 2016

Household accounts for Prince Frederick, Duke of York

Leaves from an account book, in various hands, listing salary payments to household and stable staff and payments for boardwages, allowances, and extraordinaries as well as payments from the Exchequer and other allowances, for the periods ending 5 July...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Sep 2016

Household accounts for Prince Frederick, Duke of York

Leaves from an account book, in various hands, listing salary payments to household and stable staff and payments for boardwages, allowances, and extraordinaries as well as payments from the Exchequer and other allowances, for the periods ending 5 July...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Sep 2016

Gerard Manley Hopkins, RIP

Why did Gerard Manley Hopkins die? This blog posts an article with various recent attempts at diagnosis passed on reports of his symptoms and the course of his last illness in May and June, 1889: It is also an undoubted fact, as noted earlier, that Hopkins...

Colloque : « Christie’s Education Conference 2016: Creating Markets, Collecting Art  » (Londres, 14-15 juillet 2016)

To commemorate the anniversary of the foundation of Christie’s auction house in 1766 a two-day conference will be held at Christie’s King Street, St James’s. Organised by Christie’s Education, and celebrating 30 years of the Christie’s...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 11 May 2016

Colloque : « Negotiating Art/Dealers and Museums, 1855-2015 » (Londres, 1-2 avril 2016)

The National Gallery, in association with the University of Manchester, presents a two-day international conference on the interactions between art dealers and museums (1-2 April 2016 – London, National Gallery, Sainsbury Wing, Lecture Theatre)...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 10 Feb 2016

Stroke Gathers -- Finishing

Stephanie Smith of Larkin & Smith Your gathers have been prepared, now it’s time to sew them to your cuff (or shoulder – whatever piece you are working on). In the images below we are working on a cuff.  The top of each of...

To Stroke or Not to Stroke

Stephanie Smith of Larkin & SmithAfter you have done your first section of gathering stitches; pull your thread tightly enough to crease your fabric.  At this point most instructions advise you to “stroke your gathers”.  In Mme....

The history of the late medieval book in one boxplot

One of the basic ways to describe the types used for fifteenth-century printed books is the method refined by Konrad Haebler that involves, among other things, measuring the height of twenty lines of type. The height of a typeface affected its legibility,...
From: Research Fragments on 13 Mar 2015

Alan Howard: remembering the Dream

Alan Howard as Oberon and John Kane as Puck, A Midsummer Night’s Dream Alan Howard, who died on 14 February 2015, came from a family of actors and writers, and following in the family tradition, became the most theatrical of actors. Many have concentrated...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 Feb 2015

Farewell to Alan Howard, the “great spirit” of the RSC

Alan Howard as Coriolanus Tributes have been pouring in following the death on 14 February 2015 of the great Shakespearian actor Alan Howard, who did his best work at the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1966 to 1981. Although this was a golden period for...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Feb 2015

Paper and parchment manuscripts in the Handschriftencensus

The graph below shows in purple the number of parchment manuscripts recorded per half-century, while paper manuscripts are in red. The height of each bar represents the number of total manuscripts. Other people have done this graph before, and done it...
From: Research Fragments on 13 Feb 2015

The Hand of History: Hands, fingers and nails in the eighteenth century

Firstly, apologies for the hiatus from the blog; it’s proving to be a busy summer, and this is my first post as a BBC/AHRC ‘New Generation Thinker’ – no pressure then! I’ve now started work on my second book, which relates to...
From: DrAlun on 13 Jun 2014

Upstairs, Downstairs

Elizabeth Hands’ poem “On the Supposition of an Advertisement Appearing in a Morning Paper, of the Publication of a Volume of Poems, by a Servant Maid” is simultaneously satirical, entertaining and enlightening. Although written as a...
From: Women Writers, 1660-1800 on 25 Feb 2013

Tea Time Nightmare

In the poem “On the Supposition of an Advertisement Appearing in a Morning Paper, of the Publication of a Volume of Poems by a Servant Maid,” a group of ladies discuss the possibility of a servant maid to write poetry. The ladies’ response is that...
From: Women Writers, 1660-1800 on 24 Feb 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.