The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Herbert"

Showing 1 - 20 of 62

Your search for posts with tags containing Herbert found 62 posts

Recipes and Memory: Thinking Back

Amanda E. Herbert and Annette E. Herbert Over the past two months, we’ve learned so much about recipes and memory. Sonakshi Srivastava taught us about cities, identity, and the legal as well as cultural ownership of a historic recipe. Lina Perkins...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Mar 2021

Golden State: Recipes and Memory

Amanda Elise Herbert and Annette Elise Herbert How do recipes make memories, and how do we remember the methods, ingredients, and techniques that go into making a dish, a piece of technology, a work of art, a scientific method? Memory is a powerful force,...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2021

Rock Stars of the Regency: The Gentlemen (Part 2), and What Jane Would Have Thought

By Brenda S. Cox Last week we looked at the lady “Rock Stars of the Regency” identified by Dr. Jocelyn Harris at this year’s JASNA AGM.* The other two Regency celebrities, who Jane Austen certainly knew about, but almost certainly never...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Nov 2020

When graduates voted twice

With support for the EU significantly higher among those with a university education, it’s interesting to recall that well into the 20th century graduates could vote twice in UK general elections: once in their local constituencies and again through...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Sep 2020

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 11 May 2020

Liberal-Whig History

Robert W. Passfield What has been termed ‘Whig History’ is a Liberal historiography that views history teleologically in terms of the progress of humanity towards enlightenment, rationalism, scientism, secularism, and the freedom of the individual....
From: Borealia on 6 Apr 2020

Waste Not Want Not: Leftovers – the Afterlives of Early Modern Food

By Amanda E. Herbert As part of Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a $1.5 million Mellon initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute of the Folger Shakespeare Library, I’ll be working...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Feb 2020

How the portrait of Grace Dalrymple Elliott came to be in The Frick Collection

The information about the painting shown on the Frick Collection website provides a few clues about the provenance of the portrait, but we came across more which fills in some of the gaps. Grace Dalrymple Elliott by Thomas Gainsborough. The Frick, New...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Dec 2019

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 16 Oct 2019

Textures: a Thematic Series

By Amanda E. Herbert and Marissa Nicosia In a casual conversation about hippocras recipes over a year ago, we realized we had a shared interest in the many ways that texture was represented in recipes, and we wanted to explore this interest in a Recipes...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jul 2019

Colonizing Condiments: A (Very) Short History of Ketchup

ByAmanda E. Herbert Today we imagine ketchup as the ultimate modern American food (and it is true that we like to put ketchup on…well, a lot of things).  But ketchup’s origins are found in Asia, and its adaptation into the thing that...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Apr 2019

British Beef, French Style: Robert May’s Braised Brisket

By Marissa Nicosia This recipe was developed by Marissa Nicosia for the Folger Shakespeare Library exhibition, First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas (on view Jan 19–Mar 31, 2019), produced in association with Before...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Mar 2019

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 13 Feb 2019

Tales from the Archives: Pen, Ink, and Pedagogy

This month, This Recipes Project is six years old. This September also marks our fourth Teaching Series, first launched by co-editor Amanda Herbert in 2014. This post comes from that first series, as Amanda provides some fantastic...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Sep 2018

Thévenot Continues East

Stained glass windows of the Nasir al-Mulk 'Pink Mosque', Shiraz, IranPhoto by Domiri Mohammad Reza Ganji.(Click to enlarge)Previously, we followed the progress of seventeenth century tourist Jean de Thévenot, noting his comments about glass as...
From: Conciatore on 9 May 2018

Mistranslating Macaroni and Cheese

Amanda E. Herbert Mac and cheese is a well-loved, popular, time-tested dish, one that’s woven into the histories and cultures and memories of people around the world.  In America it’s an essential soul food dish.  In Canada, Kraft...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 May 2018

Covenanter Prisoners Reject Unlawful Rule of William of Orange in 1693 #History #Scotland

The Revolution had put William of Orange and Queen Mary in power in 1689. However, some Covenanters who had proclaimed the Tinwald Paper in 1692 rejected their authority. They were imprisoned in Edinburgh’s Canongate Tolbooth: ‘This is a just...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 15 Apr 2018

Princess Caroline of Brunswick’s Journey to England, March 1795

This journey was one which would lead to a short and unhappy marriage for Princess Caroline to Prince George, later King George IV… with hindsight would she have made the arduous journey? Hindsight is a wonderful thing! Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821),...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Sep 2017

Conferencing and Conversing: Summary of Day 9 of “What is a Recipe?”

Amanda Herbert Reading over the posts and conversations on Day Nine of our digital conference “What is a Recipe?” I was struck by the many ways that our participants engaged with one another.  When we started this project, we wanted to...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jul 2017

Page 1 of 41234Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.