The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Historical fiction"

Showing 1 - 20 of 424

Your search for posts with tags containing Historical fiction found 424 posts

“Hardly men left enough to saddle their goat!”

Francis Grose (1731-1791, shown here) had a short career in the British army, filling the lowest officer’s rank of cornet during the 1740s. He later became a militia captain and adjutant. But his heart was in historical research. Grose, a hard-working...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2021

Book Review: The Firefly Witch by Amanda Hughes

I’ve had The Firefly Witch on my bookshelf since it was published a few years ago and I finally had a chance to read it – and I’m glad I did. Set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1662, we meet Circe: a red-haired girl with an amazing...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 May 2021

Book Review: ‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton

‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton follows the story of Barbara Villiers from her adolescence, her passionate relationship with her first love, Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, through her marriage to Roger Palmer, her notorious...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 Feb 2021

Ten Favorite Reads of

Despite the trauma of the pandemic (or maybe because of it), 2020 turned out to be an amazing year of reading for me. I managed to finish 44 books by the end of December, a personal record since I began keeping track in 2012 (you can see my yearly lists...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 4 Jan 2021

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #1

Over the past few weeks, we've examined ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, DRAMA, EMOTION, GLITZ, HISTORY, FRANCE, CHATEAUX and LITERARY LINEAGE as reasons to read historical fiction set in sixteenth century France. All of these contribute, in their own way, to our culminating...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 11 Nov 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #9

Two reasons left! As a literature professor as well as a writer, I hold this one close to my heart.Reason #9--LITERARY LINEAGECurrent historical fiction set in sixteenth century France participates in a rich tradition stretching back to the seventeenth...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 23 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #8

The next reason I'll propose for reading historical fiction set in sixteenth century France is a corollary of Reason #7--FRANCE, but one that merits its own mention...Reason #8--CHATEAUXFrance's scenic countryside is dotted with thousands of castles....
From: Writing the Renaissance on 20 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #7

Today's reason almost goes without saying...Reason #7--FRANCEFrance is the most popular travel destination in the world, visited by 89 million foreign tourists in 2018 alone. The country's vineyards beaches mountainsand vibrant cities tug...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 17 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #6

ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, DRAMA, EMOTION, GLITZ are the factors we've examined so far. Now it's time for one that, though obvious, nevertheless deserves attention...Reason #6--HISTORYIn today's educational landscape, the study of history hardly occupies a prominent...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 12 Oct 2020

Anna Belfrage’s ‘Glory and Gore’ Blog Event

Acclaimed historical fiction author Anna Belfrage kindly invited me on a blog event entitled, ‘Glory and Gore: The Dichotomy of the Glorious 17th Century’, and I’m honoured to have been the first guest in her line-up! Other authors of...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 5 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #4

ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, and DRAMA--these are the reasons I've examined so far to promote historical fiction set in what scholars call the "Early Modern" era. Today, we'll talk about...Reason #4: EMOTIONAlthough manners and mores have changed over the centuries,...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 2 Oct 2020

Guest Post by Karen Odden: The “Mysnomer” in the Label “Historical Mystery”

I asked Karen Odden, author of the Victorian mysteries A DANGEROUS DUET (2018) and A TRACE OF DECEIT (2019) about the differences between historical mystery and straight historical fiction. Here's what she had to say!The “Mysnomer” in the...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 30 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #3

Still looking for reasons to read or write historical fiction set in Renaissance France? Here's one sure to convince you.Reason #3: DRAMAThere's something about Renaissance dynasty dramas that strongly appeals to modern television audiences. From 2007-2010,...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 28 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #

Yesterday, I set out to convince you why reading and writing historical fiction set in Renaissance France was a worthwhile endeavor. The first reason I offered was ESCAPE from the turbulence of our present situation. Today, I offer a second reason: RELEVANCE.Reason...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 25 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? 10 Reasons

In these turbulent times, as society reels from pandemic, natural disasters, and political turmoil, one might reasonably ask: "Why read historical fiction? And why, in particular, historical fiction set in sixteenth century France?" The companion question--why...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 23 Sep 2020

Three Online Events on Revolutionary History Tonight

September usually brings a burst of historical events as the academic calendar restarts while museums and tourist sites keep appealing to visitors. This year the pandemic means that a lot of those events are being organized online, and are thus available...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2020

Book Review: ‘The Bitter Trade’ by Piers Alexander

I came across a Facebook post by historical fiction author Kate Quinn recently in which she wrote: ‘sometimes we come across books at the wrong time. We’re in the wrong mood for a particular book at a particular time, or we’re at the...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 15 Aug 2020

Summer 2020 Reading List: What I Would Have Read

I’m a bit late with this summer reading list: it’s August! And this list is more intentional than actual, so I’m not going to be able to give informed commentary on most of these books. I planned to read all of them, but as soon as the...
From: streets of salem on 4 Aug 2020

Book Giveaway: A TRACE OF DECEIT by Karen Odden

In her recent interview, Karen Odden touched upon her latest heroine, Annabel Rowe, as well as research and backstory for her third novel, A TRACE OF DECEIT. Now she is offering a copy of this book to one lucky blog reader, drawn at random. Contest rules...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 29 May 2020

Book Review: Royal Harlot by Susan Holloway Scott

'Royal Harlot' by Susan Holloway Scott takes us into the world of Barbara Villiers and her passionate life and great affair with King Charles II.
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Mar 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.