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Search Results for "John Singleton Copley"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Singleton Copley found 43 posts

Reverse Course on the Copley Cartoon?

Yesterday I mused about the possibility that a British political cartoon inspired some elements of the Loyall Nine’s anti-Stamp Act protests in late 1765—in particular, hanging the stamp agents in effigy and dedicating a tree to liberty. That...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Mar 2021

The Influence of a Stamp Act Cartoon

The more I thought about the British cartoon “The Deplorable State of America or S——ch Government,” shown above, the more I wondered about its influence on American politics. Scholars believe that this print, from an unknown artist,...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Mar 2021

Copley’s One and Only Political Cartoon

As long as I’m writing about political cartoons and about John Singleton Copley, I should note the only cartoon that Copley ever published.It survives in a single copy at the Library Company of Philadelphia collected by the Swiss artist Pierre Eugène...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2021

Henry Pelham and History Painting

While Henry Pelham’s picture of the Boston Massacre is often analyzed as a political cartoon, I suspect he was aiming for something more akin to a history painting. British artists considered history painting—portraying a dramatic moment from...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Mar 2021

Meeting the Scollays Together

In December the Shelburne Museum in Burlington, Vermont, purchased John Singleton Copley’s portrait of Mercy (Greenleaf) Scollay (1719-1793).Unknown to the seller, at least at first, the museum already owned Copley’s matching portrait of Scollay’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Feb 2021

Ebenezer Storer, at Your Service

In December 1774, a few months after Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln’s husband Bela died, a Boston merchant named Ebenezer Storer was also widowed.Storer appears here in a pastel portrait rendered by John Singleton Copley in the late 1760s, now at the Metropolitan...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2020

Copley’s Theatrical Nun at the Huntington

The Huntington Library in California just announced that it had acquired this “newly discovered painting by John Singleton Copley (1738–1815) depicting celebrated 18th-century British actress Mary Robinson.”According to the institution:Mrs....
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Oct 2020

A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife

It may have been Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s patriotic paean that belatedly canonized a heroic horseman as a key figure of the American Revolution, but... The post A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife appeared first on Journal...

“Assertions that Salem, Marblehead and Newbury had departed”

On 31 July 1770, Faneuil Hall hosted another meeting of “The Trade and Inhabitants of the Town of Boston.” The group of people invited to participate had widened again to include not just businessmen but all “Inhabitants.” Per...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Aug 2020

Hutchinson and Adams, Together at Last

Both men would hate that I’m making a combined announcement, but new volumes of the Papers of Thomas Hutchinson and the Papers of John Adams have just been published. The Colonial Society of Massachusetts is publishing the Thomas Hutchinson Papers,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2020

Copley Cousins

Two portraits of young Salem women of the mid-eighteenth century, both named Mary and newly-wed, painted by John Singleton Copley wearing the same dress! Whether you’re delving into the reform-minded Salem women of the nineteenth century or the...
From: streets of salem on 7 Mar 2020

EXTRA: Collecting “information respecting the Massacre”

As I described earlier, the first order of business at Boston’s town meeting on 6 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, was to collect “information respecting the Massacre of the last night.” This produced the earliest surviving eyewitness...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Mar 2020

“A youth, son to Captain John Gore”

The older boy wounded by Ebenezer Richardson’s shot on 22 Feb 1770 was nineteen-year-old Samuel Gore.He appears here in his early-1750s portrait by John Singleton Copley, a detail from a painting now at Winterthur. Of course, this when Sammy was...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2020

The Voyage of Nathaniel Balch

Earlier this year I introduced the figure of Nathaniel Balch, a hatter who was prominent in Boston society before and after the Revolutionary War. Balch was close to Revolutionary leaders, particularly John Hancock. In August 1769, Balch entertained at...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2019

“Expected that you personally appear at Liberty Tree”

Richard Clarke (1711-1795, shown here in a detail from a family portrait by his son-in-law John Singleton Copley) was one of Boston’s leading tea merchants.Clarke’s son Jonathan happened to be in London when Parliament passed the Tea Act of...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Dec 2019

“Charles has been guilty of a trick”

On 26 May 1786, John Adams wrote from London to his eldest son, congratulating John Quincy Adams on getting into Harvard College: Give me leave to congratulate you on your Admission into the Seat of the Muses, our dear Alma Mater, where I hope you will...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2019

“A sort of an assembly at Concert Hall”

Yesterday we left the Boston Whigs in mid-December 1768 crowing over the failure of pro-Crown officials and army officers to pull off a dancing assembly. That triumph didn’t last, however, and on 23 December the Whigs had to report:It may now be...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Feb 2019

Lt. Henry Barry: “sappy looking chap” or “calm, worthy man”?

The British army officer who asked Henry Knox to publish a political pamphlet in January 1775, as discussed yesterday, was Lt. Henry Barry (1750-1822), shown here as J. S. Copley painted him about tens years later.We know about Barry’s authorship...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jan 2019

A Portrait Vandalized at Harvard

On 26 Nov 1765 the Harvard Corporation made the following decision:Whereas Governr. [Francis] Bernard, as we are inform’d by our Treasr. hath offer’d to give his Picture to the College, Thereupon unanimously Voted, That We thankfully accept...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2018

“The same facts of…the late Samuel Adams”

In 1815 and 1816, Joseph Delaplaine (1777-1824, shown here) published one and a half volumes of Delaplaine’s Repository of the Lives and Portraits of Distinguished American Characters.The first biography in the second volume was about Samuel Adams....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Aug 2018

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