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Search Results for "Journals"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Journals found 70 posts

Joseph Plumb Martin’s Hunger Games

Not all primary sources are created equal. We venerate the Lives of the Twelve Caesars by Suetonius for providing us with a contemporary history... The post Joseph Plumb Martin’s Hunger Games appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Very Cold & Nothing Remarkable”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund Hagen, Privateer and Prisoner of War, Part 2 of

This article continues an examination of the journal kept by Dr. Edmund Hagen of Scarborough, Maine, begun in “Dispatch’t to America’: the Journal of... The post “Very Cold & Nothing Remarkable”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund...

“Dispatch’t Him for America”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund Hagen, Privateer and Prisoner of War, Part 1 of

Edmund Hagen presumably never intended the publication of his daily journal of his 1776 stint as the surgeon on a successful, but ultimately ill-fated,... The post “Dispatch’t Him for America”: the Journal of Dr. Edmund Hagen, Privateer...

1798 America's Earliest Cookbook by Amelia Simmons

American Cookery, or the art of dressing viands, fish, poultry, and vegetables, and the best modes of making pastes, puffs, pies, tarts, puddings, custards, and preserves, and all kinds of cakes, from the imperial plum to plain cake: Adapted to this country,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 16 Jun 2019

Biography of America's Earliest Cookbook Author - Amelia Simmons

Amelia Simmons. American Cookery, or the art of dressing viands, fish, poultry, and vegetables, and the best modes of making pastes, puffs, pies, tarts, puddings, custards, and preserves, and all kinds of cakes, from the imperial plum to plain cake: Adapted...
From: 18th-century American Women on 18 Sep 2014

The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI

1785 was a rare year in Paris—it was safely nestled between revolutions. The American Revolution had come to an official end right there in... The post The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI appeared...

Killer Trees of the Revolution

Around a hundred people are tragically killed in the United States each year by falling trees or limbs. Death or injury by trees was... The post Killer Trees of the Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Loyalist James Allen’s Reflection on the State of the Colonies

A councilman by profession, James Allen, esquire, lived in Philadelphia during the early years of the American Revolution. A man of considerable social prominence... The post Loyalist James Allen’s Reflection on the State of the Colonies appeared...

Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross?

When the two columns of the Continental Army slammed into Trenton at 8 a.m. on Thursday, December 26, surrounding and capturing most of the... The post Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Open Opportunities

Even while we are busy working on volume 5, we are thinking ahead to volume 6, and it would be amazing if you would join us! Some of our brilliant editorial team are moving on and some of us are eager for a new challenge within Cerae. This means that...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 5 Nov 2018

How a journal comes to be

While we are run by a crack team of PhD and ECR volunteers, Cerae endeavours to operate in the same way as any established academic journal. We are committed to disseminating Open Access research, and we are also committed to ensuring that it is of the...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 15 Oct 2018

Finding Edward Wigglesworth’s Lost Diary

Col. Edward Wigglesworth took part in some of the most consequential actions of the American Revolution, but, like so many such men, we know... The post Finding Edward Wigglesworth’s Lost Diary appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Lost Journal of Private Freeman Judd

Over the years, historians have located about thirty first-hand accounts of the American expedition into Canada in the fall of 1775. These accounts detail... The post The Lost Journal of Private Freeman Judd appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Another new ECF virtual issue launches today: it’s on...

Another new ECF virtual issue launches today: it’s on the apropos topic of propaganda, curated and with an introduction by Rachel K. Carnell, Cleveland State U. http://ecf.humanities.mcmaster.ca/propaganda/ #18thcentury #readecf #18thcenturyfakenews...

Open Access Publishing

Technology is changing academia.  The knowledge and research that has traditionally been written down in great bound volumes is becoming available as ebooks and online journals, and the models for disseminating this knowledge and research are changing. ...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 23 Jul 2018

Richard Augustus Wyvill: A British Officer’s Journal as the War Winds Down

The 38th Regiment of Foot disembarked in Boston in the summer of 1774, and spent the next nine years in America involved in some... The post Richard Augustus Wyvill: A British Officer’s Journal as the War Winds Down appeared first on Journal of...

FAQs

What’s happening with the Quinton series? Right, that’s a long story… Recently, e-book editions of the entire series, plus print-on-demand versions of the two most recent titles (The Rage of Fortune and The Devil Upon the...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 12 Mar 2018

1668 - Journal of Connecticut farmer Thomas Minor (1608-1690) mentioning his wife Grace Palmer

A Year in the Life of Thomas Minor, Connecticut Farmer, 1668.Thomas Minor (1608-1690) was born in England & sailed to New England in 1630.  Thomas Minor is considered one of the 4 founders of the Town of Stonington.  In 1653, he bought the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 20 Jan 2018

1616-1650s New England area Native Americans dying en masse

Writing in 1634 from Boston, less than 4 years after the city had been founded, John Winthrop (1588-1649), the 1st governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, & the chief figure among the Puritan founders of New England, described a population of 4,000...
From: 17th-century American Women on 8 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.