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Your search for posts with tags containing Law found 976 posts

This Week on Dispatches: James P. Sieradzki on the New Jersey Shop License Law of 178

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews attorney and local historian James P. Sieradzki about New Jersey’s attempt to stop illicit trade between... The post This Week on Dispatches: James P. Sieradzki on the New Jersey Shop...

“The Horse so furnished was Killed at the Battle”

Yesterday I discussed Richard Gridley’s petitions to the post-war Continental Congress to keep compensating him for the loss of his Crown pension from the previous wars. Both Gridley and the Congress were caught in the 1780s economy, when there...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2021

Ens. DeBerniere’s Last Trip to Concord

Ens. Henry DeBerniere went back to Concord on the British army expedition of 18-19 April. Indeed, DeBerniere probably served as a close advisor to the mission’s commander, Lt. Col. Francis Smith (shown here). The young officer had been to the town...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Apr 2021

Tay, Hayward, and the Massachusetts Government

On 19 Apr 1775, William Tay, Jr., of Woburn helped to storm a house along the Battle Road, kill two redcoats, and capture the third. He claimed that man’s arms for his own.The only problem, as Tay saw it, was that Lt. Joseph Hayward of Concord came...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2021

Owen Richards’s Lawsuits for Assault

When we left Owen Richards in May 1770, the magistrates of Boston were completely stymied in their inquiry into who had tarred and feathered him that month. Richards, a Customs officer who had also been part of the disputes that led up to the Liberty...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Apr 2021

“Strict Examination into the Affair of taring, feathering & carting Owen Richards”

Yesterday’s posting quoted two accounts of the assault on Customs employee Owen Richards on 18 May 1770. Richards and a colleague had caught a ship’s captain from Connecticut trying to sneak in undeclared barrels of sugar. They refused a bribe...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Apr 2021

Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 178

Following the campaign of 1776, New York City and environs were occupied by British forces. For the rest of the war, George Washington threatened,... The post Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

A Pyrrhic Victory in the Printers’ Case

In Parliament, 250 years ago this season, there was a big step forward in press freedom to report about how English-speaking governments worked. Back in 1731, Edward Cave launched the Gentleman’s Magazine, which among its features included detailed...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the Impeachment of Senator William Blount, the First in American History

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and JAR contributor Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the impeachment of Senator William Blount of Tennessee, the... The post This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the Impeachment...

“The same Spirit spreads like a Contagion”

I’m returning to the second Boston Tea Party and the other events of March 1774. And who better to ease us into that mindset than John Adams?On 12 March he filled his diary with this essay: There has been and is a Party in the Nation, a very small...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2021

“Storm of Witchcraft” with Emerson W. Baker, 11 Mar.

Tonight, 11 March, the History Camp online discussion series welcomes Emerson W. Baker speaking about the Salem Witch Trials.Tad Baker wrote Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience, which investigates the key players in the Salem...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2021

Ripples from the Boston Tea Party in 1774

Without the Boston Massacre reenactment looming over my schedule this year, I’ll devote the next few days to the events of early March 1774. That was less than three months after the Boston Tea Party, and the ripples from that big splash in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2021

Investigating Slaves at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House

Last month the Cambridge Historical Society issued a report on the history of slavery at its headquarters, called the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House.In particular, the society wanted to collect information about any enslaved people living in that farmhouse...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Feb 2021

Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: New Jersey Soldier Oliver Cromwell

Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in 1849. She became a major conductor on the Underground Railroad, as well as an advocate for Women’s Rights.... The post Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: New Jersey Soldier Oliver...

“Adventurous Wives” Conference via Chawton House

Chawton House is an Elizabethan manor once owned by Jane Austen’s brother. It houses the research library of the Centre for the Study of Early Women’s Writing, 1600–1830.In that capacity, Chawton House will host an online conference...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2021

The Forest Rebel

“His hand was against every man, and every man’s hand against him”—Genesis “The world was not his friend, nor the world’s law”—Shakespeare A German academic, colleague and close...

Exits, Entries and the Allure of the Runaway Nun

Guest post by Gwen Seabourne, 17 February 2021. Entries on the rolls of judicial sessions in Yorkshire in 1304 and 1306 tell tales of disturbing events at two of the county’s convents. Representatives of Barkston Ash and the Ainsty informed...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 17 Feb 2021

Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: Edward Hector, Bombardier and Wagoner

Nat Turner launched a bloody uprising among enslaved Virginians in Southampton County in 1831 the same year that William Lloyd Garrison of Boston began... The post Nineteenth-Century Remembrances of Black Revolutionary Veterans: Edward Hector, Bombardier...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.