The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Literacy"

Your search for posts with tags containing Literacy found 18 posts

Jane Ratcliffe and the life of an ‘upper middling’ woman in seventeenth-century Chester

In our Social Status Calculator Jane Ratcliffe is given as an example of a typical ‘upper middling’ woman. This blog uses the limited surviving source material to further flesh out Jane’s social and cultural life in seventeenth-century...
From: Middling Culture on 13 Apr 2021

April 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “… till she behaves more like an obedient Wife.” From New England to Georgia, runaway wife advertisements frequently appeared in early American newspapers. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Apr 2021

Pen, Ink, Paper

We are thrilled to host this guest post from Dr Paula Simpson, who works at the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, and who is currently writing a book on Tithe Disputes in Early Modern England: Everyday Popular Protest in the Diocese of Canterbury...
From: Middling Culture on 1 Mar 2021

Revising Tillmann Taape’s Recipes against the plague – in pharmaceutical code?

Editor’s note: Today we revisit a post originally published in 2013 by Tillmann Taape on plague remedies given by the apothecary Hieronymus Brunschwig in his Liber pestilentialis (1500). The book included an interesting mix of recipes in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 May 2020

WFH 1: Working From (the early modern) Home

1: Doing business at home with teenagers As we, like the rest of the world, settle into the climate of pandemic lockdown, we thought we’d put together a short series on past experiences of “Working from Home”—something to which...
From: Middling Culture on 4 Apr 2020

Mary Marsden #HerBook

The Twitter hashtag #HerBook and blog Early Modern Female Book Ownership have revealed much about early modern women’s literacy, their reading habits and book ownership, and it seems particularly fitting to promote the growing scholarship on these...
From: A Fashionable Business on 8 Mar 2020

Humphrey Beckham, Craft, and Literacy among the Middling Sort

A common misconception when thinking about those below the level of the elite is that the majority were completely illiterate, with no reading or writing ability whatsoever. Many of those at the centre of Middling Culture were indeed literate, though...
From: Middling Culture on 20 Dec 2019

April

GUEST CURATOR:  Mary Bohane What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (April 20, 1768).“Alexander Findlay & James Seyour, A.M. DESIGN TO OPEN SCHOOL.” Alexander Findlay and James Seymour...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Apr 2018

Literacy Afloat

Sketch between Decks, May 75, Gabriel Bray, 1775, National Maritime Museum.The first thing we have to recognize in examining literacy among common sailors of the eighteenth century is that literacy is a spectrum. We should be careful not to conflate being...
From: British Tars, 1740-1790 on 8 Jan 2018

Laura SanghaHow did early modern folk learn to read? Perhaps...

Laura SanghaHow did early modern folk learn to read? Perhaps they used an Elizabethan hornbook like this one from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Collections, 1993-31/652. The face of the hornbook would have a sheet of either vellum or paper pasted or...

Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and a Revolutionary Praxis for Education, Part I

By Kevin Gannon Educational theory and practice has always been a contested terrain, even if many of the practitioners in these fields deny that controversies bubble beneath their work’s placid surface. In the mid-twentieth-century United States,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Jul 2017

January 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (January 21, 1767).“He will undertake to fair-copy and engross any deeds.” Patrick Poulson turned to the advertising section of the Georgia Gazette in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Jan 2017

Students and the digital edition. A polemic

This is the text of a talk I gave at the panel session for ‘Opening the book: reading and the evolving technology(ies) of the book’ for Academic Book Week, at the Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Study, London. 10th November,...
From: Manicule on 25 Nov 2015

Play, experiment, and digital pedagogy

First of all, a hat-tip to Willard McCarty: during a talk at Bath Spa University in March of this year, he quoted early-twentieth-century English critic I. A. Richards and it was this that crystallised my scattered thoughts on my students’ encounter...
From: Manicule on 4 May 2015

21stC web activist and 18thC feminist in one speech …

              Dame Martha Lane Fox, who is championing the setting up of an Institute  – Dot Everyone – to drive digital knowledge in the UK, quoted the late internet activist Aaron Swartz in her talk...
From: Manicule on 17 Apr 2015

Note from a Bristol Glassmaker

This weekend, The Sloane Letters Blog celebrated its first anniversary and the recent addition of the 3000th letter to the database! On this occasion, it seems appropriate to reflect on Letter 3000. The short letter was written in late October 1727 by...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 16 Sep 2013

Recipes against the plague – in pharmaceutical code?

By Tillmann Taape Although the plague is best known for having wiped out about a third of Europe’s population in the fourteenth century, it continued to loom large as a threat to people’s health for hundreds of years, and medical … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Sep 2013

No Substitute for Shakespeare

While recently travelling to speak at an English teacher’s convention on the use of Shakespeare’s works in the elementary school classroom, I spent the day before my trip frantically writing plans for my substitute teacher. My fifth and sixth-grade...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 9 Jan 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.