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Your search for posts with tags containing Literature found 841 posts

The 2021 Annual Volume

The seventh Journal of the American Revolution Annual Volume is now available. Each annual volume highlights articles selected by our editorial board from the... The post The 2021 Annual Volume appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

For the Teacher: Creating an online high school class project on Northanger Abbey that engages students

The Matthews Project Introduction: Inquiring readers, The teacher who supervised the creation of this project, Ben John Wiebracht, contacted Vic Sanborn of Jane Austen’s World in the summer of 2020 to propose a research project his students would...
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 May 2021

Covetousness

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Apr 2021

Can America Rock Again?

Earlier this month the Washington Post pubished Prof. Paul Ringel’s essay about Schoolhouse Rock, A.B.C.’s interstitial Saturday morning cartoon, and how it handled the nation’s history.Ringel wrote: “Schoolhouse Rock,” the...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Apr 2021

Bad Will Scarlet and the Good Sheriff: “Robin Hood: A Tale of the Olden Time” (1819)

Stephen Basdeo Between 1818 and 1822, the legendary medieval outlaw, Robin Hood, featured prominently in Romantic literature. John Keats’ poem Robin Hood: To a Friend (1818); Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe (1819); and Thomas Love Peacock’s...

“Mysteries of the People” (1848): Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel

By Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family, and their descendants, who participated in all...

Ishiguro’s Klara and the Sun takes on the big questions

During the pandemic I have started reading more fiction again, and any new book arriving through the post has been greeted with some excitement. Yet, I had pre-ordered Kazuo Ishiguro’s latest novel with a mix of both eager anticipation and an ever-so-slight...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 10 Apr 2021

M.P. Shiel’s “The Purple Cloud” (1901)

By Stephen Basdeo The book was a legend … out of space, out of time … he had the character of a poet and a prophet — a prophet, I mean, in the Old Testament sense.[1] Those words above were used by the poet Edward Shanks (1892–1953)...

Andrew Marvell at 4

The seventeenth-century poet, politician and prose satirist Andrew Marvell has been a large part of my life for the past 20 years. A short commemoration of that journey. … More Andrew Marvell at 400
From: Writing Privacy on 31 Mar 2021

Homework for Table Talks II

Texts and Rationales for Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society The first Table Talks event went with a bang before Christmas. You can still check out the recording here. Our next event in June promises to be just as exciting...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 31 Mar 2021

Defending the English Revolution in the German Lands

A German translation of Marchamont Nedham’s True state of the case of the Commonwealth (1654). In his study of the contemporary reception of the English Revolution in the German-speaking lands of continental Europe, Günter Berghaus stresses...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 29 Mar 2021

A Great Tea-Drinking: Collective Memory and Victorian Invalid Cookery

By Bonnie Shishko Midway through Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1853), Esther Summerson relinquishes her beloved role as adopted housekeeper and assumes another: sick nurse. In a tense scene that’s painfully relevant in this era of COVID,...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Mar 2021

Finding Your Beard Style in the 19th Century

In the previous post I noted the variety of facial hair styles that were worn by men in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, depending on factors including status, location and age. Rather than each age having one particular style of facial hair that...
From: DrAlun on 12 Mar 2021

Of Kebabs and Lawsuits: A Case for Authenti‘city’

By Sonakshi Srivastava Authenticity is a reflexive term, its nature is to be deceptive about its nature. — Carl Dahlhaus There is an instance in Intizar Husain’s popular novel, Basti, where, while dining at the Shiraz, a restaurant in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Mar 2021

Paper Houses

My manuscript is completed and has been dispatched to London, so last night I actually started reading a non-academic book, the first in a year or more. I didn’t last long, between the covers and between the sheets, because I’m tired, but...
From: streets of salem on 27 Feb 2021

Imperial historian, imperial daughter: Anna Komnene and The Alexiad

Few, if any, historians have been so high born as Anna Komnene, first daughter of the Byzantine emperor Alexios I, who came into the world in the porphyry-lined room of the Palace of Boukoleon, overlooking the harbour of Constantinople and the Sea of...
From: Mathew Lyons on 15 Feb 2021

Review: Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution

Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution by Michael D. Hattem (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2021) In his new... The post Review: Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution appeared...

The 2020 JAR Book-of-the-Year

The Journal of the American Revolution is pleased to announce The Boston Massacre: A Family History by Serena Zabin (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) as winner of... The post The 2020 JAR Book-of-the-Year appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.