The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "London"

Showing 1 - 20 of 851

Your search for posts with tags containing London found 851 posts

The British Constitution in Crisis: The Gordon Riots and the American Revolution

By Lauren Michalak In the first week of June 1780, London was nearly brought to its knees by a week-long riot. Rioters destroyed all but one prison, attacked the properties and bodies of judges and politicians, and attempted to sack the Bank of England....
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 May 2021

May 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Lower Terms than can be at any Shop or Store in the Province.” Although “Sadler and Jockey Cap-Maker” Richard Sharwin signed his entire name at the end...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 May 2021

“Revealing Recipes” Workshop Video Now Available

The 2021 “Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women” workshop is now available  here. Hosted by the Wellcome Collection and organized in tandem the Royal College of Physicians, the event kicked off EMROC’s annual transcribathon,...
From: emroc on 23 Apr 2021

April 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Spencer has already given convincing proofs of his abilities.” In the spring of 1771, Brent Spencer, a “Coach & Coach Harness MAKER,” opened a new...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Apr 2021

Easter in Jane Austen’s Day: a pastiche of information

Happy Easter, gentle readers. Many of the customs followed in the early 19th century by Jane Austen and her family are still followed today in one fashion or another. For this blog post, I have gathered information already known to many, and some that...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Apr 2021

Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 178

Following the campaign of 1776, New York City and environs were occupied by British forces. For the rest of the war, George Washington threatened,... The post Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

Trouble Brewing: Ale, Beer, and Witchcraft

A new article on The Conversation, which seems to have gained quite a lot of traction, argues that the modern iconography of witchcraft – namely pointed hats, cauldrons, broomsticks, and cats – can be traced to the commercial practices of,...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Mar 2021

Romantic London and Horwood’s Map

Horwood's Map of London and surrounding cities and boroughs allow readers and researchers a closeup view of London in the late 18th-early 19th centuries.
From: Jane Austen's World on 17 Mar 2021

March 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “PROPOSALS FOR PRINTING.” Thomas Green and Samuel Green, printers of the Connecticut Journal in New Haven, planned to publish “A careful and strict Examination...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Mar 2021

February 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Just received advice from London of the fashions advanced for the court ladies this year.” Thomas Hartley made stays or corsets for “the LADIES” of New...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Feb 2021

Book Review: ‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton

‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton follows the story of Barbara Villiers from her adolescence, her passionate relationship with her first love, Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, through her marriage to Roger Palmer, her notorious...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 Feb 2021

Workshop Report: Drugs and Drollery

It was an honour for the Wellcome Collection to join Intoxicating Spaces and a group of eminent scholars for an online workshop that took place on 21–22 January 2021 on Modes of Persuasion: Humour and the Promotion and Control of Intoxicants Past...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 17 Feb 2021

February 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Wanted, a Negro Woman, that understands all Kinds of Houshold Work.” The Slavery Adverts 250 Project seeks to identify, remediate, and republish every advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Feb 2021

Transcribathon 2021: Revealing Recipes

4 March 2021Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women: Lady Sedley’s from the RCP and Lady Ayscough’s from the Wellcome Collection Please join the Early Modern Recipe Online Collective (EMROC), Royal College of Physicians...
From: emroc on 27 Jan 2021

Whifflers, boy players and drummers: project team presents findings

On 13th January 2021 project PI Tracey Hill and postdoctoral research assistant Charlie Berry gave a paper to the Institute of Historical Research’s Centre for People, Place and Community seminar. Tracey and Charlie introduced the methods and...

January 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “To be Sold by Garret Noel, at New-York … and at the Printing-Office in N. London.” Timothy Green, printer of the New-London Gazette, augmented revenues by selling...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Jan 2021

Westminster Coroners Inquests 1760-1799, Part

This is the second of a two-part series about the Westminster Coroners’ Inquests data. See part 1 for more detail about the source of the data, and my initial explorations of the summary data. This post focuses more on the text of inquisitions (the...
From: Early Modern Notes on 10 Jan 2021

Legal Trouble in Pembroke

Back on Thanksgiving, I mentioned that the Rev. Kilborn Whitman (1765-1835, shown here) delivered the holiday sermon in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1798. I also noted that Whitman decided not to get involved in the Quincy Congregationalist meeting’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2021

Don Giovanni in Flanders

 Spanish attack on a Flemish village,Attr:  Pieter Snayers. (click to enlarge)In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp, possibly the most productive period of his...
From: Conciatore on 18 Dec 2020

Page 1 of 43123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.