The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Long Eighteenth Century"

Your search for posts with tags containing Long Eighteenth Century found 15 posts

All Things Georgian: Tales From the Long Eighteenth-Century

We have some exciting news to share with you, our readers, today. As well as writing our bi-weekly blog posts, we have also been working on our fourth book together… and this one is based on our blog! In fact, we’ve reused the name, and the...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Mar 2019

Richard Challoner, RIP, January 12, 1781

Richard Challoner, Vicar Apostolic for the London District in England, died on January 12, 1781. The Vicar Apostolic structure provided support for Catholic priests and laity in England in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries until the...

L0078310 Engraving of tools used for carving food.

L0078310 Engraving of tools used for carving food.: New batch of historial images, all in the public domain, loaded onto the Wellcome Library Flickr this summer.

Book Review: Persecution without Martyrdom

From the publisher, Gracewing:Persecution Without Martyrdom: The Catholics of North-East England in the Age of the Vicars Apostolic 1688-1850by Leo Gooch978 0 85244 819 9  -  488 pages   -  £20.00 (I received a review...

Laundromat in Italy, 1805-style. Most of these women are wearing...

Laundromat in Italy, 1805-style. Most of these women are wearing some sort of clog or sandal, perhaps to avoid slipping in this wet, stone room, or to keep their regular footwear from getting soaked on laundry day. So many costume details can be discovered...

That’s some rustic macaroni-eating. I found this color...

That’s some rustic macaroni-eating. I found this color plate and the accompanying text in a book published in 1806. Another post from the long 18th century, but that’s where I find the most color options! The explanatory text made me laugh. I will...

And It Arrived on My Birthday! A Review Copy from Gracewing

This looks like a fascinating study of a period that's not so well known in the history of Catholicism in England after the English Reformation--and I do agree that the usual view of that era is that it was very quiet and stagnant: Persecution Without...

"Lobsters," a broadside from around 1650, features an acrostic...

"Lobsters," a broadside from around 1650, features an acrostic about this noble (and delicious) crustacean. I know this is a little early for the period covered by the journal, but I couldn’t resist posting this. And how did this slender, fragile piece...

Becoming Jane Austen, 21st Century Style

From The Wall Street Journal, Joy Y. Wang writes about her attempt at time travel, including wearing clothing from Jane Austen's era:IT IS A TRUTH universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a spare room must be in want of a lodger.That...

Another colourful print from the long 18th century: “The...

Another colourful print from the long 18th century: “The Refreshment” (pub. by S&J Fuller, 1818), del. H. Alken, sculpt. Sutherland. After a thirsty ride while fox-hunting, the hounds, horses, and men stop for refreshment. Hounds take over the horse...

The Masters golf tournament just finished up on Sunday in...

The Masters golf tournament just finished up on Sunday in Augusta, Georgia. Although Scottish golfers played the game for hundreds of years before the rest of the world caught on to its delights, one of the oldest golf clubs (aka “goff society”) in...

George Morland (1763-1804), Selling Cherries (1801) What a...

George Morland (1763-1804), Selling Cherries (1801) What a pleasant family scene: mom and dad and the kiddies out in the front yard, buying fruit from a passing vendor. Even the dog wants to try a freshly picked red cherry. The aquatint engraving from...

Happy Birthday to a Hagiographer!

Father Alban Butler was born on October 10, 1710. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, "he shares with the venerable Bishop Challoner the reputation of being one of the two most prominent Catholic students during the first half of the dreary eighteenth...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.