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Search Results for "Manuscripts"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Manuscripts found 643 posts

Ledgers for Durrant estate of Scottow, Norfolk

The first of two extensive manuscript account books from the house, the Day Book records receipts from 22 Sept 1759 (£10,513. 10. 5 1/2) to 1769 (£3820. 5. 1 3/4) and expenses 22 Sept 1759 (£10,341. 6.6.) to 1769 (£3683. 19. 9...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 May 2021

Covetousness

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Apr 2021

Ker’s Pastedowns online

St George’s Day is celebrated in several countries around the globe — Ethiopia, Georgia, Portugal for example. In 2021, there is another reason to consider it a red-letter day: it sees the launch of the online edition of Ker’s Pastedowns...

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

Documenting mistakes in our documentation

If someone points out a typo in an online Finding Aid or a Hamnet catalog record, we gratefully say thank-you, fix it, and (usually) move on.1 Sometimes, though, a big enough mistake has been around for a long enough time that we can’t just move...
From: The Collation on 23 Mar 2021

Documenting mistakes in our documentation

If someone points out a typo in an online Finding Aid or a Hamnet catalog record, we gratefully say thank-you, fix it, and (usually) move on.1 Sometimes, though, a big enough mistake has been around for a long enough time that we can’t...
From: The Collation on 23 Mar 2021

A Missing Link for New College Puddings

By Helga Müllneritsch Almost nothing is known about the creators of the Begbrook Manuscript (AC 1420). It was purchased in the nineteenth century by the collector Daniel Parsons (1811-1887), and his collection was probably given to the Downside Abbey...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2021

Monks Using Astronomical Instruments

The manuscript Ambrosiana H 57 sup. includes two texts on the astrolabe, Philoponus’s as well as an anonymous one from perhaps the late 13th century (though this copy is dated 14th century). Along with these texts are a couple Ptolemaic works and...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2021

Byzantine Tables of Planetary Hours

The tradition of planetary hours established a ruling planet for each hour of each day. The first hour of the day was ruled by the planet that also gave the day its name, e.g., the sun ruled the first hour of Sunday. Each subsequent hour was ruled by...
From: Darin Hayton on 23 Jan 2021

“What manner o’thing is your crocodile?”: July

Welcome back for another Crocodile Mystery! As you enjoy this first week of July (really? really? Who said the calendar could do that?), spare some thoughts for this mystery image. What’s going on in this image? What are those letters and what might...
From: The Collation on 30 Jun 2020

This Post Stinks, or, ‘I hope that the stuff will not smell too vilely’

John Masefield has a burning question he needs answered. Literally. Writing from his home Hill Crest in Boar’s Hill, Oxford, the Poet Laureate asks theater production veteran Allan Wade a crucial question about staging his home theatrical production...
From: The Collation on 19 Jan 2021

: The Year in Collecting (part 2)

I shared most of the 2020 acquisitions in an earlier essay, but saved one book, two manuscripts, and some exonumia for this second part. The book is an unusual one for me--a 17c Italian work on the game of Ombre:Del giuoco dell'ombre. Bologna 1688.The...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 14 Jan 2021

Missing Archives

Not a day goes by that I don’t miss being able to work in the archives. Travel restrictions that prevent me from going to and working in the archives I need for my research depresses me, to say the least. The fact that there is no end in sight compounds...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Jan 2021

Seminar in Palaeography and Manuscript Studies, 2021

Seminar in Palaeography and Manuscript Studies Convenors: Daniel Wakelin, Martin Kauffmann Meetings will take place online via Zoom on Mondays at 2.15pm (GMT) in weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7. Original manuscripts will be shown. Registration is required. E-mail:...
From: The Conveyor on 7 Jan 2021

Fun with Astrological Abbreviations

Copies of (ps-)Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός often contain a variety of common and sometimes not so common abbreviations and symbols for astrological terms. Aphorism 97 in this particular manuscript (BnF gr. 2509) includes...
From: Darin Hayton on 5 Jan 2021

Six medieval manuscripts, two laptops, a curator and a document camera

  Teaching with library material has been continuing at the Bodleian’s Weston Library for Special Collections even as provisions to protect the health of staff and readers have placed restrictions on the numbers and movement of people within...
From: The Conveyor on 16 Nov 2020

Canine Cures or Our Best Friend…

By Marc Bruck To paraphrase the old adage: dogs are humanity’s best friend. Loving, loyal and protective, they are often considered members of the family. They are symbols of wealth and power, love and affection. Recent accounts in the popular press,...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2020

Drinking the Ink of Prayer

By Genie Yoo  [1] Sometimes historians dream of moments of recognition in the manuscripts they encounter. The act of reading or reciting, writing or copying, can trigger a distant memory, allowing one to draw a line connecting two seemingly unrelated...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2020

Around the Table: The Making and Knowing Project

This month on Around the Table, we have a very special treat. Many of our contributors have been a part of the Making and Knowing Project and we have enjoyed occasional updates on the project throughout the years. Here, we have an update and reflection...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Oct 2020

Perpetual Prognostications: Medieval ‘Recipes for Living’

The year is 1459, and you are a relatively prosperous landowner in Oxfordshire. Now that spring is in the air, you must go and visit your merchant friend in London, but you find yourself uneasy about the journey. With the poor condition of recently thawed...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Oct 2020

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