The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Massachusetts Council"

Showing 1 - 20 of 83

Your search for posts with tags containing Massachusetts Council found 83 posts

Tay, Hayward, and the Massachusetts Government

On 19 Apr 1775, William Tay, Jr., of Woburn helped to storm a house along the Battle Road, kill two redcoats, and capture the third. He claimed that man’s arms for his own.The only problem, as Tay saw it, was that Lt. Joseph Hayward of Concord came...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2021

“Strict Examination into the Affair of taring, feathering & carting Owen Richards”

Yesterday’s posting quoted two accounts of the assault on Customs employee Owen Richards on 18 May 1770. Richards and a colleague had caught a ship’s captain from Connecticut trying to sneak in undeclared barrels of sugar. They refused a bribe...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Apr 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

Evacuation Day Lecture Now Online

I’ve put “The End of Tory Row,” my Evacuation Day talk for Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters, online at YouTube. Because this was an online talk, I loaded my PowerPoint up with more graphics. I hope those survive...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2021

“A determination to discourage a faithful Servant of the Crown”

For acting governor Thomas Hutchinson, the dispute between his Council and the provincial secretary Andrew Oliver was yet one more headache in 1770. On 28 September, Hutchinson told the departed but still official governor, Sir Francis Bernard: “[Royall]...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Dec 2020

“The breach of a most essential privilege of this Board”

On 12 Oct 1770, eight members of the Massachusetts Council delivered their depositions about what had happened on 6 March, the day after the Boston Massacre. Harrison Gray, who was also the provincial treasurer, dated his testimony 9 October while the...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Dec 2020

The Massachusetts Council Investigates Itself

Yesterday we left off as provincial secretary Andrew Oliver’s sworn statement about what members of the Massachusetts Council had said on the day after the Boston Massacre made its way back to Massachusetts. That statement was the final item in...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Dec 2020

“To see the minutes made by the secretary”

Here’s another controversy from 1770 that I didn’t note on the exact 250th anniversaries of its notable dates since I had other topics at hand and, frankly, it was drawn out more than it really deserved. On 6 March, the day after the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Dec 2020

Press Coverage of the Owen Richards Riot

On 21 May 1770, Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy reported: Last Friday Night Owen Richards, one of the Tidesmen belonging to the Custom-House, was Tarred, Feathered and Carted thro’ the Town for several hours, for having as ’tis...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2020

“See the Junto Cheat the deluded People with the Shew of Liberty”

As Thomas Hutchinson expected, no one claimed the province’s £100 reward for information on who left a handbill on the Town House lambasting the judges in the Boston Massacre trials. However, the friends of the royal government still had a...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2020

“See the Court cheat the injurd people With a Shew of Justice”

It should be no surprise that Bostonians continued to wrangle over the Boston Massacre trials even after they ended with two manslaughter convictions and eleven acquittals. One response was recounted by Thomas Hutchinson in the last volume of his history...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Dec 2020

“A Letter was left by some unknown Person”

In 1770, the Boston town meeting named Henry Barnes as one of a small group of businesspeople who were openly defying the town’s non-importation agreement.Barnes was unusual in that group because his shop and main business were off in rural Marlborough,...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2020

“The principal cause of the Mobbish turn in this Town”?

Early this month I recounted some moments in the mid-1700s when the royal governors of Massachusetts found themselves stymied by crowds protesting for their traditional liberties.Without army units nearby or a large, full-time police force, no power in...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2020

“A very Grand Brick Building, Arch’d all Round”

On 4 Mar 1748 the Massachusetts General Court tackled the question of where to build a new meeting-place in Boston, now that it had considered and eliminated Cambridge and Roxbury.A committee proposedthat they should go at four o’Clock this Afternoon,...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jun 2020

“To build a Court-House in the Town of Roxbury”

On 17 Feb 1748, the Massachusetts house heard from a second committee on what to do about the Town House, the legislature’s usual meeting hall, which had burned the previous November.The first committee had recommended building a new Court-House...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jun 2020

Speaker Hutchinson Had a Plan for That

As I’ve been tracking, in February 1748 the Massachusetts house voted not to rebuild the burned Town House or Court-House in Boston. Instead, those legislators voted to construct a new meeting-place in Cambridge.A big reason for that move was undoubtedly...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2020

A New Voice in Boston Politics in 1748

On the morning of 12 Feb 1748, the Massachusetts house, before returning to the question of whether to rescind its vote to build a new meeting-place in Cambridge, took note of a different issue.A member of the Council came down with that body’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jun 2020

“The said House shall be built in the Town of Cambridge”

On 3 Feb 1748 (N.S.), the Massachusetts General Court gathered for a new legislative session in Boston.The next day’s Boston News-Letter stated that the General Court met in Faneuil Hall. (In his 1825 history of Boston, Caleb Snow wrote that...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2020

How “the House was consumed” in 1747

On the morning of 9 Dec 1747, as I described yesterday, Bostonians discovered that their Town House was on fire.In that month the brick building in the center of town was hosting a session of the Massachusetts General Court.According to a legislative...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jun 2020

“The publick Damage sustain’d by this sad Disaster”

The 10 Dec 1747 Boston News-Letter reported:Yesterday Morning between 6 & 7 o’ Clock were were exceedingly surprized by a most terrible Fire which broke out at the Court-House in this Town, whereby that spacious and beautiful Building, except...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jun 2020

Page 1 of 512345Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.