The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Material Culture"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Material Culture found 301 posts

New Research at Cahokia Mounds Site in Illinois

New archaeological excavations at Cahokia, Illinois, have been investigating evidence of deforestation and flooding at the site of a major indigenous urban center. The New York Times reports that “A thousand years ago, a city rose on the banks...

“Lost Golden City” Discovered in Egypt

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an important ancient Egyptian city near the modern city of Luxor. The archaeological excavations began in September 2020 and seem to be revealing the “lost golden city” of Akhenaten. National...

Object Lessons: Co-Creating an Exhibition with School Pupils and the German Maritime Museum

One ear-achingly chilly day in February 2020, forty-odd pupils from secondary schools in Oldenburg and Neu Wulmsdorf, three teachers and I descended on the German Maritime Museum (DSM) in Bremerhaven. Our mission? To explore the museum’s extensive...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 1 Apr 2021

NIU Undergraduate Researcher Publishes Research

I want to highlight the accomplishments of one of our undergraduate students in the Department of History at Northern Illinois University, whose research experiences reminded me of my own experiences conducting research as an undergraduate History Major...

Tea: The Most Normal Thing in the World?

Yaela van Oel, Pieternel Pompe, Pablo Kamsteeg, and Joska BergAlfa Academy Next to water and coffee, tea is the most preferred and imbibed drink on earth. People drink it when they get together, as a moment to calm down or wake up. In this blog we take...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Mar 2021

New Digital Humanities Techniques Open Locked Letters

Early modern writers sometimes employed letterlocking in order to close letters securely using complex practices of folding, cutting, inserting tabs, and sewing. The New York Times reports: “In an era before sealed envelopes, this technique,...

Workshop Report: Drugs and Drollery

It was an honour for the Wellcome Collection to join Intoxicating Spaces and a group of eminent scholars for an online workshop that took place on 21–22 January 2021 on Modes of Persuasion: Humour and the Promotion and Control of Intoxicants Past...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 17 Feb 2021

Digital Humanities Confronts Cubism

Digital Humanities methods are increasingly used in humanities research, teaching, and presentation through a myriad of techniques. Digital tools and methods offer possibilities of analyzing texts, images, objects, and artifacts in different ways...

A Violin and the Mechanisms of Peace and Reconciliation

A violin constructed by Giuseppe Guarneri, an eighteenth-century violin maker from Cremona known as del Gesù (of Jesus), has become the center of a controversy over the legacies of Nazi coercion and looting of artworks belonging to Jewish victims...

Seminar on Latin Sources in the Archives of the Crown of Aragon

Graduate students interested in medieval history, and particularly those wanting to learn how to use Latin sources in medieval archives, may be interested in an upcoming Mediterranean Summer Skills Seminar: Introduction to the Archive of the Crown of...

Loyalists and the Birth of Libraries in New England: The Marriage of Martin and Abigail Howard

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Abby Chandler Martin Howard was a Revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Jan 2021

“That great Sacrifice was made, through sad Necessity”: Charles Willson Peale’s William Pitt and the Emblemology of Tyrannicide

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By J. Patrick Mullins In the summer of 1768,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 11 Jan 2021

Dress UP Salem

Maybe you’ve seen this week’s New Yorker cover: a woman in her apartment on her computer, presumably in a Zoom meeting. She’s wearing a lovely blouse, earrings, and lipstick and her hair looks great, so all “above”...
From: streets of salem on 5 Dec 2020

Exploring London’s Intoxicating Spaces Through Mudlarking

The River Thames as it flows through London is tidal, meaning twice per day part of the riverbed is exposed for a few hours. This area, known as the Thames foreshore, is a rich archive of (among other things) the remnants of two millennia of the city’s...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Dec 2020

‘Simplify me when I’m dead’: emotions and agency, an intersubjective and hauntological approach

Introduction I begin with Keith Douglas’s poem, Simplify me When I’m Dead (1946), whose title I incorporate in my own title. The poet’s imagining of what will be remembered of him after his death touches me as a historian and speaks...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 28 Nov 2020

“La gloria es suya y nadie puede quitársela”: Estatuas, monumentos y la memoria del racismo en Cuba

La serie “Latin America’s Ongoing Revolutions” explora los ángulos coloniales y postcoloniales de la historia revolucionaria de la región. ¡Lean la serie completa! [This post is a part of our “Latin America’s...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Nov 2020

Beer, Wine, and Spirits: Reflections on Intoxicants and Ghosts

This spooky season – while holed up in an isolated North Yorkshire farmhouse in the shadow of a Bly-esque seventeenth-century manor – I’ve been thinking about the connections between intoxicants and ghosts, which don’t seem to...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 31 Oct 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.