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Search Results for "Medici"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Medici found 1365 posts

Chinese American Herbal Medicine: A History of Importation and Improvisation

By Tamara Venit Shelton “Chinese herbalists imported everything from China.” This is what I consistently heard from herbalists I interviewed when writing Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace. As far as...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jul 2021

Casanova and medicine

Casanovas’s Guide to Medicine, by Lisetta Lovett (Pen and Sword Books, 2021). Forget the stereotype! Most people on hearing the name Casanova immediately think of a libertine and debauched figure, tropes peddled by numerous films (of which the 1976...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 15 Jul 2021

Renaissance Fairs and Pandemics

En garde ! Renaissance fairs are reopening across the United States this summer, bringing the clanging of arms and armor back to an enthusiastic public. These festivals celebrate late medieval and Renaissance culture through costume displays and historical...

June 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Boxes of Medicines for Plantation Use … will also contain a Phial of his famous FEVER DROPS.” When apothecary Thomas Stinson purchased the shop and inventory of another apothecary,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Jun 2021

June 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Those who live remote shall have their Orders as faithfully complied with as if present themselves.” Apothecaries Nathanael Dabney and Philip Godfrid Kast competed for customers. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Jun 2021

Painting a Pandemic: Domenico Gargiulo’s “Plague at Naples” (1656)

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Domenico Gargiulo, Largo Mercatello a Napoli durante la peste del 1656. Oil on canvas. Museo Nazionale di San Martino.(Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) It is...

Interview with the Editors: The Cultural History of Medicine

By Elaine Leong, Lisa Smith and Laurence Totelin The Cultural History of Medicine, a six-volume collection under the direction of Roger Cooter, was published in April 2020 by Bloomsbury. The editors of three of its volumes happen to be past or present...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Jun 2021

A British Soldier Debilitated by Nostalgia in 1781

In 1786, the British journal Medical Commentaries included an article from Dr. Robert Hamilton (1749-1830) of Ipswich titled “History of a remarkable Case of Nostalgia affecting a native of Wales and occurring in Britain.” In July 1780 Hamilton, a...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2021

Painting a Pandemic: Napoleon Visiting the Sick

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He has published books and articles on various subjects including the history of crime, radicalism, and socialism. Antoine-Jean Gros, Bonaparte visitant les pestiférés de Jaffa. 1804....

Nostalgia “a frequent disease in the American army”

The words “nostalgia” and “nostalgic” don’t appear in any of the letters and other sources available at Founders Online. But of course most of those writers weren’t physicians. American doctors did use the diagnosis of nostalgia, learning...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jun 2021

Painting a Pandemic

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK Nicolas Poussin, The Plague at Ashdod, 1631. Oil on canvas. Paris, Louvre (Public Domain Reproduction licensed under Wikimedia Commons) Plagues have left their mark on popular culture:...

First Appearance of Bubonic Plague in History

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Plague, or Yersinia pestis, has “plagued” humankind throughout history. Since at least the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian in the 500s—and likely for much longer before that—it...

A Mistaken Idea of Nostalgia’s Origin

As I discussed yesterday, in 1688 the medical school graduate Johannes Hofer (1669-1752) published a dissertation proposing a new diagnostic term: nostalgia. The symptoms of this condition, Hofer wrote, included: continued sadness, meditation only of...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jun 2021

A Glasgow Doctor Battles a Cholera Outbreak

On the morning of December 21st [1853], at six o’clock,[i] I was called on by a working man to visit his wife, whom he described as having been taken with cramps about three o’clock the same morning. I went with him to his house, 115 Garscube Road,...

When and Why Johannes Hofer Wrote about ”Nostalgia“

Last month I gave a presentation about the first year of the Continental Army to the interpretive staff at Boston National Historical Park. One of the good questions that came up was whether we know of men in that army who suffered from what we now call...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2021

The Later Career of Henry DeBerniere

On 18–19 Apr 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was in the column of British troops that marched to Concord and back. Having visited the town looking for cannon the month before, he was probably one of the main guides for his regimental commander, Lt. Col....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2021

June 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “It is also by special appointment sold by Mr. Daniel Martin, in Boston.” Many patent medicines were widely available from apothecaries, shopkeepers, and even printers throughout...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jun 2021

The Death of Thomas Hutchinson

Thomas Hutchinson was born on 9 Sept 1711 to a wealthy Boston merchant. His father valued education so much that he funded the building of a new Latin School in the family’s North End neighborhood. Naturally, of course, that school benefited the Hutchinson...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2021

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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