The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Pandemic"

Your search for posts with tags containing Pandemic found 15 posts

A Student’s Diary of the Spanish Flu (1918)

As students travelled to begin their fall term studies at Montana State College, USA, in 1918, the Spanish Flu pandemic travelled there with them as well. A number of students came down with the flu and the sick among them were housed in special barracks....

Ceræ Volume 8 Call For Papers

Exile, Isolation, and Quarantine 2020 has been a year when exile, isolation, and quarantine have been inescapable. As we try to deal with and make sense of an uncertain present, we look to the past for precedent: research as well as think pieces on...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 28 Dec 2020

Conference Review – Thoughts on the 2020 digital Leeds IMC and the future of meetings and conferences in the age of COVID-19

In this blog post, Victoria Shirley of the Ceræ editorial board shares her impressions of the 2020 virtual Leeds IMC The 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic has upended the models of teaching students and exchanging research that we have used for decades....
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 16 Oct 2020

The Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon goes virtual

The second week in October is when Stratford-upon-Avon’s Shakespeare Club normally begins its season, when up to a hundred members meet in the Music Room at Mason Croft, Marie Corelli’s house and now the home of the Shakespeare Institute for...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Oct 2020

If You Build it, They will Come

Two very different tourist towns during the Pandemic of 2020: at the beginning of the summer, I was up in my hometown of York, Maine, so I wrote about its opening in the midst of Covid with every intention of writing a comparative “bookend”...
From: streets of salem on 29 Sep 2020

Crazy Times: A joint post about 2020 with some advice for new PhDs

It has been a while since we wrote a blog post, the end of January to be exact. A post was partially planned for early March, but we all know what happened then. So here at the start of the academic year of 2020/21 we reflect on the past year and our...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 25 Sep 2020

People in Motion Podcasts on the History of Pandemics

The People in Motion: Entangled Histories of Displacement across the Mediterranean (PIMo) network of historians is providing a series of podcasts on the history of pandemics to provide a deeper context for understanding on the current Covid-19 pandemic....

Summer 2020 Reading List: What I Would Have Read

I’m a bit late with this summer reading list: it’s August! And this list is more intentional than actual, so I’m not going to be able to give informed commentary on most of these books. I planned to read all of them, but as soon as the...
From: streets of salem on 4 Aug 2020

Eat, Drink & Be Merry

For the most part, I’ve managed to avoid dwelling on the pandemic and I must admit that I haven’t been that affected by it either, apart from the radical reconfiguration of my work environment! My struggle is to improve my online communication...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jul 2020

Experiencing museums in times of crisis

The little house in Buckow where Brecht and Weigel spent their summers.  Now that the lockdown is easing in many parts of Germany I thought it would be a good idea to visit a few museums. It was definitely nice to be out and about again  despite...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 13 Jun 2020

Plague and pageantry

The project team are currently working remotely whilst archives and libraries are closed due to the COVID pandemic. Our project covers a period in history when epidemic disease was a regular event, especially in overcrowded London. The city’s population...

Leadership matters in the first days and weeks of an outbreak: lessons from the Great Plague of Marseille, 300 years later

It seems as though American society has all but ground to a halt: all sporting events postponed or canceled, Broadway shuttered, entire states closing schools and businesses, and issuing stay-at-home orders. While these tactics may seem extreme, the goal...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Apr 2020

Live streaming Shakespeare during lockdown

Schaubuehne Theatre Hamlet It’s spring 2020 and many of us are confined to home in social isolation during the Coronavirus pandemic. With theatres, museums, galleries and cinemas closed, cultural organisations have been quick to announce initiatives...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 Mar 2020

Killer Advertising—How Canadians Were Sold the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Kate Barker As news reports come in of scammers trying to leverage a global pandemic into profit at the expense of Canadians, it is an interesting time to examine the equivalent during the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic. Patent medicine companies and others...
From: Borealia on 23 Mar 2020

A (Very) Brief History of the Pox

In 1495 Europeans began to remark on the appearance of a new ‘terrifying, troublesome, and painful sickness’. Those afflicted suffered from aching bodies covered with ulcerations, and pustules which could ooze and stink. In its most horrific...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 21 Jul 2016

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.