The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Patrick Henry"

Showing 1 - 20 of 27

Your search for posts with tags containing Patrick Henry found 27 posts

Cicero and the American Revolution

Despite Cicero’s significant reputation and widespread readership, little scholarship has focused upon Cicero’s reputation and oratorical practices’ influence upon the Founding Generation. Once Cicero... The post Cicero and the American...

The American Revolution in Alexandria, Virginia: Upheaval in George Washington’s Hometown

Alexandria, Virginia, is well known as George Washington’s hometown, but its role during the American Revolution is not widely understood. Like the rest of... The post The American Revolution in Alexandria, Virginia: Upheaval in George Washington’s...

This Week on Dispatches: Michael Cecere on Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor, author, and educator Michael Cecere on his recent article about Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Michael Cecere...

Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775

It had been a very hectic week in Williamsburg for Peyton Randolph, the Speaker of Virginia’s House of Burgesses and the President of the... The post Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Sons of Liberty and Mob Terror

The day did not start out well for Andrew Oliver. The recently appointed Stamp Act Distributor for colonial Massachusetts awoke on the morning of... The post The Sons of Liberty and Mob Terror appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Officers Who Never Saw Combat

HaldWe asked our contributors, “Who is your favorite military officer that never saw any combat?” The intent was to showcase officers who saw no... The post Officers Who Never Saw Combat appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Reconciliation between the Colonies and Great Britain—A Close Call

There were many attempts, before and during the American Revolution, to avoid armed conflict via negotiation, or to stop the war after it began.... The post Reconciliation between the Colonies and Great Britain—A Close Call appeared first on Journal...

How Robert Morris’s “Magick” Money Saved the American Revolution

The year 1780 ended badly, and the new year boded worse for America’s War of Independence. Maj. Gen. Benedict Arnold’s treason and defection to... The post How Robert Morris’s “Magick” Money Saved the American Revolution...

The “Parson’s Cause:” Thomas Jefferson’s Teacher, Patrick Henry, and Religious Freedom

As Tidewater lands played out, exhausted from repeated tobacco plantings, or were encumbered by inheritance, the established church moved with young planters like Peter... The post The “Parson’s Cause:” Thomas Jefferson’s Teacher,...

Patrick Henry’s Gerrymandering

Elizabeth Kolbert’s New Yorker essay “Drawing the Line,” a review of David Daley’s new book on modern computer-aided gerrymandering, starts out with this snatch of early Virginia politics:Sometime around October 20, 1788, Patrick...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jul 2016

Patrick Henry’s “Liberty or Death”—Granddaddy of Revolution Mythologies

I first encountered Patrick Henry in fifth grade. He was the patriot of “Give me liberty, or give me death!” fame—not to be confused with that other “H” patriot, Nathan Hale, who was disappointed because he had only one life...

Virginia Resolutions “of an extraordinary Nature” in Newport

Two hundred fifty years ago today, on 24 June 1765, the Newport Mercury carried an item about the Stamp Act. That wasn’t unusual—American newspapers were starting to fill with essays warning about Parliament’s new law. The Mercury story...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jun 2015

Virginia Takes an Even Less Firm Stand Against the Stamp Act

None of Virginia’s established political leaders liked the Stamp Act. Gov. Francis Fauquier (shown here) had advised his superiors in London against it. John Robinson, speaker of the House of Burgesses, and Peyton Randolph, attorney general, had...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 May 2015

Virginia Takes a Less Firm Stand Against the Stamp Act

On this date 250 years ago the Virginia House of Burgesses took up the resolutions against the Stamp Act that Patrick Henry had drafted the previous day. Those same legislators had narrowly approved them as a committee of the whole, but this was the official...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 May 2015

Virginia Considers a Firm Stand Against the Stamp Act

Britain’s North American colonies had a chance to weigh in on the Stamp Act before Parliament passed it, as described back here. All of them said it would be a Bad Thing. Few or none offered any alternative way for the Crown to raise revenue for...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 May 2015

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.