The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Political Thought"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Political Thought found 24 posts

Working with Translations in the History of Political Thought

The Europa regina from Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia (C16th).   As part of my project on ‘English republican ideas and translation networks in early modern Germany’, I look at the ways in which ideas from the English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 May 2021

Defending the English Revolution in the German Lands

A German translation of Marchamont Nedham’s True state of the case of the Commonwealth (1654). In his study of the contemporary reception of the English Revolution in the German-speaking lands of continental Europe, Günter Berghaus stresses...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 29 Mar 2021

Workshop: ‘Ideas and translation in early modern Europe’, Newcastle, 22 April

As part of my Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship I am organising my first little workshop at Newcastle University to bring together historians and literary scholars with cognate interests in the area of translation and ideas transfer. It is intended as...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 28 Feb 2021

Re-reading old history books

Caroline Robbins’ classic. Part of the joy of starting a new research project is that you get the chance to read a lot of new literature. I am currently reading about translation and conceptual history, book history and the history of English republicanism....
From: The History Woman's Blog on 22 Jan 2021

What Germans made of the English Revolution

The Works of John Milton in an C18th edition held at Leipzig University. Library. I know, it does not seem the best time to start a new research project in the midst of a pandemic. To begin with, many libraries and archives are still shut or operating...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 9 Dec 2020

A coaching inn in Augsburg

Choosing a cover image for a book is tricky, especially on an early modern subject. Ideally, the image should relate both to the title and contents of the book and be available on one of the standard image sites. Since my book is entitled The English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 22 Aug 2020

How I got to The English Republican Exiles in Europe

The cover image shows a coaching inn in Augsburg. The cover image has been selected, the proofs are done, and my new book on The English Republican Exiles in Europe During the Restoration is finally going to press – due out, the content manager...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Aug 2020

How not to write women out of history

The Parliament of Women (1646), on which Neville based his satirical libels. Admittedly, my headline sounds a bit dramatic. But I am serious about this. Several years ago, I reviewed two books in short succession: one, a collection of essays on Oliver...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 17 Jan 2020

Royalist Republicans in the United Provinces

The cover of an excellent book. I have just finished reading Helmer Helmers’ The Royalist Republic (CUP, 2015), which offers a profound challenge to received views of Anglo-Dutch relations during the seventeenth century, in particular the idea...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Dec 2018

Crisis and Renewal with Aristotle and Machiavelli

Honoré Daumier, L’Équilibre européen (1866) I’m just on the train back from the ESHPT conference on ‘Crisis and Renewal in the History of Political Thought’ in Heidelberg and, as so often happens after an event...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 13 Oct 2018

Translation Matters

Some excellent books on early modern translation. I work at the Foreign Services Desk of a news agency and I moonlight as an intellectual historian of early modern Britain. Both jobs have been fostering my obsession with translation. Part of my day...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 7 Sep 2018

Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First-Century Politics

I love Newcastle and the Lit&Phil, and this workshop on Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First-Century Politics was probably one of the most fun public history events I have yet participated in. Rachel Hammersley managed to get together a...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 2 Jun 2018

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

Leviathan in the Library

I am preparing the first of a brace of talks that I am to give this week. They are on a rather different topics from each other but they are both to be presented in the same location, the ball-room-like expanse of the Upper Library of Christ Church, Oxford....

The eloquent ideologists of Germany’s New Right

Thugs in combat boots they’re certainly not. The people Volker Weiss writes about are more of the nerdy variety, he told me over the phone a while back. They know their Greek and Latin, but that doesn’t necessarily make them harmless. It’s...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 2 Apr 2017

An exile’s home: Algernon Sidney in Nérac

So, that’s the castle in France where the English republican Algernon Sidney (1623-1683) spent roughly five years of his exile during the Restoration period: le château de Nérac in the capital of the Pays d’Albret in the south...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 17 Mar 2017

Uncertainty and the post-truth society

Niccolò Machiavelli knew about the importance of appearances. The word ‘Brexit’ entered the Oxford English Dictionary for the first time this month, only weeks after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the United States...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Dec 2016

Political Thought in Times of Crisis, 1640-1660 – Symposium, 1-3 Dec

Sponsored by the Folger Institute Center for the History of British Political Thought, Washington, US. Was the mid-seventeenth-century crisis in Britain and Ireland essentially one aspect of a broader “global” crisis? How might scholars theorize...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 27 Jul 2016

Being a refugee

Woodcut illustration from The Isle of Pines (1668). It’s weird to be writing a book about English republican exiles in the seventeenth century while thousands of refugees from the Middle East and Africa make their way to Europe every day. I’ve...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 14 Feb 2016

"After 200 years of writing on the subject, much of it brilliant, historians have left us, as so..."

“After 200 years of writing on the subject, much of it brilliant, historians have left us, as so often, very sophisticated and very confused.” - Henry May, The Enlightenment in America (1976), xiii.
From: Revolutionary Thoughts on 5 Sep 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.