The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Posts"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1206

Your search for posts with tags containing Posts found 1206 posts

Say Ohm: Japanese Electric Bread and the Joy of Panko

By Nathan Hopson In 1998, the New York Times introduced readers to an exotic new ingredient described as “a light, airy variety [of breadcrumb] worlds away from the acrid, herb-flecked, additive-laden bread crumbs in the supermarket,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 May 2021

The Curing Chocolate of Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma of 1631

By R.A. Kashanipour “The number of people drink who chocolate is vast,” wrote the seventeenth century Spaniard, Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma, “not only in the Indies, where the beverage originated, but also in Spain, Italy and Flanders,...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2021

“Revealing Recipes” Workshop Video Now Available

The 2021 “Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women” workshop is now available  here. Hosted by the Wellcome Collection and organized in tandem the Royal College of Physicians, the event kicked off EMROC’s annual transcribathon,...
From: emroc on 23 Apr 2021

Thomas Gage’s Chocolate Recipe and Regimen of 1655

By R.A. Kashanipour In A New Survey of the West-Indies of 1655, the English friar Thomas Gage celebrated the ubiquitous consumption and qualities of chocolate throughout the early modern Spanish Atlantic World, particularly in New Spain. “Chocolate,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Apr 2021

“A Recipe for Cooking Husbands,” and Nineteenth-Century Joke Recipes

Avery Blankenship, PhD Student, Department of English, Northeastern University “A good many husbands are utterly spoiled by mismanagement,” begins a recipe printed in the December 31, 1885 edition of the South Carolina Anderson Intelligencer...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Apr 2021

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

Around the Table: Publisher Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Karen Merikangas Darling, an Executive Editor in the Books Division at the University of Chicago Press, about the process of publishing recipes-related research. Thank...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Apr 2021

Recipes and Memory: Thinking Back

Amanda E. Herbert and Annette E. Herbert Over the past two months, we’ve learned so much about recipes and memory. Sonakshi Srivastava taught us about cities, identity, and the legal as well as cultural ownership of a historic recipe. Lina Perkins...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Mar 2021

My Soda Bread

By Kathleen Lynch There was something wrong about the package that was delivered to me at work one early spring morning years ago. It was addressed to me, and the return address also had my surname. But I didn’t recognize the name as a family member,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Mar 2021

Garcinia Longings

By Rini Barman My digestive tract goes for a toss once seasons are about to change in Assam. I am speaking of that eerie intermediary period when the winds, too, aren’t very sure which direction to follow. With rising temperatures and global warming...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Mar 2021

Grandma Sloan’s Houska

By Lina Perkins Wilder My family makes houska wrong. Hoska [sic] 2 cakes yeast ¼ c lukewarm water 1 c milk scalded ½ c sugar ¼ c shortening 2 t salt 4 ½-5 c sifted flour 2 T fennel seed 2 eggs ½ c raisins ½ c...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Mar 2021

From OUP to Aix-en-Provence: The Reliquiae has arrived at LERMA’s

I’m very grateful to my research centre (LERMA) for purchasing the brand new edition of the Reliquiae for its library at Maison de la Recherche. Having this invaluable source at the Centre will allow our graduate students to dig into Baxter’s...
From: Dissenting Experience on 14 Mar 2021

Transcribathon Accomplishments

Just look what we’ve done!  Transcribers in our 2021 Revealing Recipes event produced over 300 pages of manuscript transcriptions, according to FromthePage’s statistics. It took 170 of us, but we made our way through every page of the...
From: emroc on 10 Mar 2021

Mary Anning: Britain’s greatest dinosaur hunter

Extinction is an old fact but a new idea. In the early 19th century its certainty was barely established. How many people, then, had the anatomical knowledge and geological expertise to identify extinct species – that is, creatures whose final form...
From: Mathew Lyons on 9 Mar 2021

Thank you!

Another transcribathon comes to an end… Thank you to everyone who participated. And thank you to the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Royal College of Physicians Museum, and the Wellcome Collection who partnered with us for this event.  We...
From: emroc on 4 Mar 2021

Adding a new Manuscript: Ann Fanshawe’s collection

All the pages in the Ayscough and Sedley manuscripts have been claimed, but we have more! We’ve added a tab for the Fanshawe manuscript in our Google Sheet. Just follow the instructions in your Getting Started with Transcription tab. They’ll...
From: emroc on 4 Mar 2021

Questions arising…

Mac Issues with Google Docs A few people have indicated problems using Google Docs from their Macs. Safari and Google Docs often don’t work well together, so changing the Browser to Chrome may help. You might also log into your Google account to...
From: emroc on 4 Mar 2021

Welcome Transcribers!

Thanks so much for coming, Transcribers! We’re so glad you could join us. Signed up to FromthePage?  Filled in our super-quick voluntary survey? Chosen a page to transcribe? Grabbed a cuppa for #EMROCsnacks? Put on some groovy EMROCks tunes?...
From: emroc on 4 Mar 2021

Around the Table: Museum Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! Today we have a chat about the recipes-related collections at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., especially the National Museum of American History (NMAH)! I am delighted to speak with Ashley Rose...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Mar 2021

Join us for our March 4 Transcribathon

4 March 2021Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women: Lady Sedley’s from the RCP and Lady Ayscough’s from the Wellcome Collection Please join the Early Modern Recipe Online Collective (EMROC), Royal College of Physicians (RCP)...
From: emroc on 3 Mar 2021

Page 1 of 61123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.