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Search Results for "Rebecca Laroche"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Rebecca Laroche found 43 posts

Teaching Transcribathons and Experiential Learning

By Liza Blake This post is one of seven scheduled to appear in The Recipes Project’s upcoming September Teaching Series, which focuses on new ideas and strategies for teaching with recipes. As we all prepare for the next EMROC Transcribathon …...
From: emroc on 21 Aug 2018

Exploring CPP 10a214: Of Binaries and Collaboration

By Rebecca Laroche and Hillary Nunn When we began this blog project in February 2013, we did not know where it was going to take us. We always saw our work with College of Physicians of Philadelphia Manuscript 10a214 as a work in progress, a work on progress....
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Aug 2017

Exploring CPP 10a214: Close Textual Ties

By Rebecca Laroche with Hillary Nunn Hillary Nunn’s discoveries about the identification of the Layfield hand of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia (CPP) manuscript with Edward Layfield, Archdeacon of Essex, has had me reconsidering earlier...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Mar 2017

EXPLORING CPP 10A214: ENTER LADY HONYWOOD, CONTINUED; GETTING IT ON PAPER

By Hillary Nunn with Rebecca Laroche Elaine Leong’s posting about paper’s use as a medical tool inspired me to look more carefully at instances of paper in the Layfield manuscript, which Rebecca Laroche and I have been examining in this series....
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Aug 2016

Manus Christi Height

By Monterey Hall Wellcome Manuscript 169, fol. 25r As indicated by Katrina Rutz to the introduction to the Bulkeley Project, Elizabeth Bulkeley’s A boke of hearbes and receipts contains a section that tells the reader how to recognize five different...
From: emroc on 23 Jun 2016

EXPLORING CPP 10A214: A New Candidate for the Layfield Hand, Part

By Hillary Nunn with Rebecca Laroche In my last posting, I reported on a possible new match for the Layfield hand that appears in CPP 10A214. It looked so promising that my collaborator Rebecca Laroche and I immediately began exploring how a new identity...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jun 2016

EXPLORING CPP 10A214: A New Candidate for the Layfield Hand, Part 1

By Hillary Nunn with Rebecca Laroche The more Rebecca Laroche and I work with the College of Physicians manuscript, the more enmeshed we become with the religious politics of the mid-seventeenth century. Rebecca’s most recent post, on the transcription...
From: The Recipes Project on 31 May 2016

LOCATING TRADITIONAL PLANT KNOWLEDGE IN HOUSEHOLD RECIPES: PART 4

By Anne Stobart This is the last of four posts about my investigation into traditionally used native (folkloric) plants in medicinal seventeenth-century recipes. In the first two posts (here and here) I looked at the most frequently appearing plants and...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 May 2016

“A medicine to Clarifye the Eyesighte.”

By Monterey Hall In my previous post, I discussed Mistress Vernam and her contribution to Lady Frances Catchmay’s Booke of Medicins (https://f.hypotheses.org/879).  I had run across a single possible match for Mistress Vernam in the genealogical...
From: emroc on 7 Mar 2016

EMROC’s Coming Up Roses in 2016

By Rebecca Laroche Once again, EMROC enters a new term filled with exciting discoveries and steady progress toward our collective goals. Through our teaching and research, we look to transcribe, vet, and tag as well as present our findings and our progress...
From: emroc on 28 Jan 2016

Pumpkins and cabbages: vegetables in Shakespeare’s Windsor

At the end of the growing season the shops are full of produce, with onions, pumpkins and other vegetables in store for the winter. As the harvest hymn has it, “all is safely gathered in /ere the winter storms begin”. In a lovely little book...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 3 Nov 2015

Exploring CPP 10a214: Anne Layfield Reading Bishop Andrewes

By Rebecca Laroche with Hillary Nunn In our June entry on the College of Physicians of Philadelphia Layfield manuscript, I introduced the pages written in Anne Layfield’s own hand, the devotional pages that begin the Layfield half of the book. …...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Aug 2015

A Ladies Home Journal in 18th-century Nottinghamshire, England

by Lisa M. Lillie Tucked away in the Papers of the Mellish Family of Hodstock, Nottinghamshire, in the University of Nottingham’s Rare Books and Manuscripts collections, Lady Mellish’s “Old Accts dinners & c. 1706” sits rather...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Jul 2015

Exploring CPP 10a214: The Place of Devotion

By Rebecca Laroche with Hillary Nunn Since we last posted in 2014, Hillary Nunn and I have been able to meet in Philadelphia and look at the College of Physicians manuscript together. This was an unprecedented convergence, and we are … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Jun 2015

“Take Good Syrup of Violets”: Robert Boyle and Historical Recipes

By Rebecca Laroche, in consultation with Steven Turner Some time ago, Steven Turner of the National Museum of American History and I published our discovery that Robert Boyle’s Experiments and Considerations Touching Colours (1664) reflected knowledge...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Apr 2015

Exploring CPP 10a214: The Downings of Massachusetts Bay

Hillary Nunn, with Rebecca Laroche No one from the Downing family was at the first Massachusetts Bay Thanksgiving in 1621. It's interesting to note, though, that the Downings – a family that Rebecca Laroche and I have been mapping into … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Nov 2014

Exploring CPP 10a214: Overlapping Territories

By Rebecca Laroche with Hillary Nunn In her most recent entry in this series, Hillary Nunn showed through genealogical and geographical research how the Downings and the Layfields had people and places in common.  This month’s entry raises a related...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Nov 2014

Quantities in Recipes

In my post last month, I discussed an online course in which students contributed their transcriptions of Lady Frances Catchmay‘s recipe book to the Textual Communities site.  Two of these students from Fall 2013 continued their work in the spring,...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Oct 2014

Teaching Recipes Online: Building Community and Purpose

Rebecca Laroche, University of Colorado Colorado Springs I started teaching an early modern survey of women writers online in 2002.  My reasons were many, not the least of which were feminist.  Serving a largely military community, the University of...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Sep 2014

Teaching Recipes: A September Series

Amanda E. Herbert In January of 2014, I wrote a post called “Chocolate in the Classroom,” which described a special lesson that I’d designed for my undergraduate Tudor and Stuart Britain course: to learn about the aesthetic and cultural changes...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Sep 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.