The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "SAA"

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Your search for posts with tags containing SAA found 253 posts

August

Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Run-away … a Molatto Fellow named BEN.” On July 20, 1771, Ben, an enslaved man, liberated himself from Isaac Woodruff of Waterbury, Connecticut.  Two...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Aug 2021

The 2nd Connecticut Regiment at Edge Hill

A fire fight erupted on the densely wooded Pennsylvania ridge. Caught in a crossfire from three sides, men of the 2nd Connecticut Regiment began... The post The 2nd Connecticut Regiment at Edge Hill appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Azor Betts be sent to Ulster county jail”

As I quoted yesterday, on 20 May 1776 Gen. George Washington ordered that no one associated with the Continental Army should be inoculated against smallpox.Four days later, Dr. Isaac Foster appeared before the General Committee of the City of New York...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 May 2021

May

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “UMBRILLOES.” A brief advertisement in the May 20, 1771, edition of the Boston-Gazette informed readers of “ALL Sorts of UMBRILLOS, made in the neatest Manner, and very cheap,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 May 2021

The Lost DeBerniere Manuscripts

On 30 June 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the 10th Regiment of Foot. Nine months later, on 17 March 1776, he evacuated Boston with the rest of the British military. That departure was rushed enough that Lt. DeBerniere...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2021

Dots on the Ensign’s Map

Yesterday I started to discuss a hand-drawn map from the Library of Congress that Ed Redmond has identified as likely coming from British army spy Ens. Henry DeBeniere weeks before the march to Concord.That map marks several individual homes. Some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2021

Joseph Dobel in the Continental Navy

Yesterday I discussed the early career of Joseph Doble, who followed his father in becoming a ship’s captain sailing out of Boston. Today I’ll skip over Owen Richards’s lawsuit and discuss Doble’s record in the Revolutionary War.I’ll...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Apr 2021

Commemorating Patriots Day 2021 Safely

Here in Massachusetts we’re still in a race to vaccinate people against the Covid-19 virus even as cases are rising again. The end of the pandemic is in sight, but we need to minimize casualties.Wisely, the local organizations that lead the commemoration...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Apr 2021

Book Review: ‘The World of Isaac Newton’ by Toni Mount

Isaac Newton is one of the most well-known personages of the Stuart and Georgian periods for his towering intellect and his role with the Royal Society. When we think of those amazingly multi-talented Stuart people, Newton is definitely one of them. Toni...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 23 Mar 2021

A Pyrrhic Victory in the Printers’ Case

In Parliament, 250 years ago this season, there was a big step forward in press freedom to report about how English-speaking governments worked. Back in 1731, Edward Cave launched the Gentleman’s Magazine, which among its features included detailed...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

February 21

What do newspaper advertisements published 250 years ago today tell us about the era of the American Revolution? “LIBERTY.  A POEM.” “RUN-AWAY … a Negro Boy named SAY.” Like every other newspaper printer in colonial...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Feb 2021

January 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Stop the Felons!” Although colonial newspapers carried stories about a variety of events, much of the crime reporting appeared among the advertisements.  Rather...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Jan 2021

Newton Again, and Again, and Again

Two recent stories on Isaac Newton seem to point once again to our undying fascination with all things Newton. On the one hand, a pair of articles in The Guardian announce and then report on the auction of some partially burnt notes on measuring Egyptian...
From: Darin Hayton on 2 Jan 2021

Paste Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 14 Dec 2020

Isaac Hollandus

 J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on...
From: Conciatore on 11 Dec 2020

Paying for the Defense in the Massacre Trials

On 12 Nov 1770, after receiving word that Capt. Thomas Preston had been found innocent of the Boston Massacre, Gen. Thomas Gage wrote to him from New York. Gage was pleased Preston was no longer “oppressed by the most malicious Prosecution”...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Dec 2020

Coffee House Culture: A Guest Post by Toni Mount

In England, under Oliver Cromwell’s Puritan regime, drunkenness was considered an ungodly sin but, at the time, as for centuries before, ale or beer were the safest drinks. Water might be a more godly drink but the danger of swallowing disease-causing...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 Oct 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.