The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Saint Domingue"

Your search for posts with tags containing Saint Domingue found 10 posts

Anne Rossignol, Madame Dumont, and Dr. John Schmidt Junior: Community and Accommodation in Charleston, South Carolina, 1790 – 184

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Suzanne Krebsbach In 1857, physician John...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Feb 2021

“Thrown into this Hospitable Land”: Saint-Dominguans in Virginia, 1796-187

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Frances Bell In October 1809, a Frenchman...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Jan 2021

Guest Post: Julia de Recour, the Digital Archive, and the Histories of Atlantic Children of Color

Today’s Guest Post comes from Nathan H. Dize, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University.  He specializes in Haitian literature and history. His dissertation, currently entitled “Mortuary Poetics:...
From: The Junto on 28 Nov 2018

Le Cap to Carlisle: News of the Early Haitian Revolution in the United States

This post is a part of a series entitled “(In)forming Revolution: Information Networks in the Age of Revolutions.” By James Alexander Dun Enslaved people in the North Province of French Saint Domingue rose in revolt on the night of August...
From: Age of Revolutions on 20 Sep 2017

Rumor and Report in Affiches Américaines: Saint-Domingue’s American Revolution

By Rob Taber “A pamphlet circulates in the colonies of America with the title ‘Common Sense.’ Mister Adams, one of the delegates to Congress, happens to be the author. This work entirely erases the idea of reconciliation and excites...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Sep 2017

Elizabeth Drinker’s Haitian Revolution

By James Alexander Dun Elizabeth Drinker, a Quaker woman living in Philadelphia, heard stories from Saint Domingue.  She recorded some of them in her diary, a record she kept in various forms for nearly 50 years, beginning in 1758 and ending days...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Sep 2016

Lessons from A Colony in Crisis: Collaborative Pedagogy and the Digital Humanities

By Abby Broughton, Kelsey Corlett-Rivera, and Nathan H. Dize When we originally came up with the idea for A Colony in Crisis: The Saint-Domingue Grain Shortage of 1789 in the summer of 2014, we envisioned a pedagogical tool that would help facilitate...
From: Age of Revolutions on 15 Jul 2016

Touring the Haitian Revolution: A Photo Journal

By Paul Clammer On my first trip to Haiti, I was, like many people, shamefully ignorant of its history. I had heard of Toussaint Louverture but little of what he did, though I knew enough to realize that packing a copy of CLR James’ The Black Jacobins...
From: Age of Revolutions on 27 Jun 2016

Haitian Revolution Reading List

Age of Revolutions Reading List #4 Haitian Revolution For our fourth list, we asked Marlene Daut and John Garrigus – two experts in the Haitian Revolution – to list the top five books they would suggest to graduate...
From: Age of Revolutions on 15 Jun 2016

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.