The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Stamp Act"

Showing 1 - 20 of 227

Your search for posts with tags containing Stamp Act found 227 posts

Reverse Course on the Copley Cartoon?

Yesterday I mused about the possibility that a British political cartoon inspired some elements of the Loyall Nine’s anti-Stamp Act protests in late 1765—in particular, hanging the stamp agents in effigy and dedicating a tree to liberty. That...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Mar 2021

The Influence of a Stamp Act Cartoon

The more I thought about the British cartoon “The Deplorable State of America or S——ch Government,” shown above, the more I wondered about its influence on American politics. Scholars believe that this print, from an unknown artist,...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Mar 2021

Copley’s One and Only Political Cartoon

As long as I’m writing about political cartoons and about John Singleton Copley, I should note the only cartoon that Copley ever published.It survives in a single copy at the Library Company of Philadelphia collected by the Swiss artist Pierre Eugène...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2021

John Rutledge: Delegate from South Carolina, 1765–1775

John Rutledge is one of those members of the founding generation who often get overlooked. Yet, for every Jefferson, Adams, or Washington, there were... The post John Rutledge: Delegate from South Carolina, 1765–1775 appeared first on Journal of...

March 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Feast of ST. PATRICK is to be celebrated, together with the Repeal of the STAMP-ACT.” According to advertisements in the New-York Journal in February and March...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Mar 2021

March 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “To all the Friends of LIBERTY … 61 71.” Last week the Adverts 250 Project featured this advertisement calling on “all the Friends of LIBERTY”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Mar 2021

February 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Celebrating the Repeal of the oppressive Stamp-Act.” Just as Americans participated in the commodification of events associated with the American Revolution several...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Feb 2021

Some Say the Tea Will End in Fire

Today’s the 247th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, which is impressive, though not quite at Sestercentennial level.Earlier this month a student working on a History Day project asked me why the Sons of Liberty tossed the East India Company tea...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Dec 2020

William Allen and His Family: Tories or Patriots?

Common wisdom paints William Allen, a wealthy and prominent Pennsylvanian, as a traitor to the cause of American independence. As the revolution grew, the... The post William Allen and His Family: Tories or Patriots? appeared first on Journal of the American...

“Revere in Perspective” Symposium, 7-9 Oct.

This week the American Antiquarian Society is hosting a virtual symposium on Paul Revere, with events from Wednesday, 7 October, through Friday, 9 October.Planned in conjunction with the traveling museum exhibit “Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere”...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2020

Samuel Adams’s Two Character References for William Story

When William Story was preparing to sail to London in late 1771, Thomas Cushing wasn’t the only Massachusetts Whig he asked for a letter of reference. Story also asked Samuel Adams, clerk of the Massachusetts house, to write on his behalf. On 27...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Oct 2020

When William Story Sailed to London

On 2 Oct 1771, the speaker of the Massachusetts House, Thomas Cushing, wrote a letter to that body’s lobbyist in London, Benjamin Franklin. Though the letter enclosed some legislative news, Cushing was really writing a reference for the man who...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Oct 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Dayne Rugh on the Connecticut Sons of Liberty

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Director of Education for Slater Memorial Museum and JAR contributor Dayne Rugh on his recent article about... The post This Week on Dispatches: Dayne Rugh on the Connecticut Sons of Liberty...

“A Day which ought to be forever remembered in America”

Earlier this month I posited that the American Revolution began on 14 Aug 1765 with the earliest public protest against the Stamp Act, the first step in turning a debate among legislatures into a continent-wide mass movement.After the riots on 26 August,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Aug 2020

“It was a very unfortunate time to preach a sermon”

The Rev. Jonathan Mayhew insisted that, even though his sermon on 25 Sept 1765 decried the Stamp Act, Bostonians couldn’t have taken that as encouragement to riot against royal officials.But crowds did riot the following night, and in particular...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2020

“As if I approved of such proceedings”

On Tuesday, 27 August, the day after a mob destroyed Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s house, some people blamed the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew’s latest sermon.In his history of Massachusetts, Hutchinson wrote the sermon had implied “approbation...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Aug 2020

“Nothing Remaining but the bare walls & floors”

As evening fell on Monday, 26 Aug 1765, crowds started to gather on the streets of Boston.It was twelve days after the town’s first big protest against the Stamp Act and the provincial stamp agent, Andrew Oliver. Back then, some men had threatened...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2020

“Brethren, ye have been called unto liberty”

In 1765, 25 August was a Sunday, so the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached a sermon at the West Meetinghouse in Boston. Mayhew was one of the town’s most radical ministers in two ways:Though a strong Congregationalist, he leaned theologically toward...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Aug 2020

When Did the American Revolution Begin?

Is this the anniversary of the day the American Revolution began? That of course depends on accepting the idea that the American Revolution started on an identifiable day instead of building up gradually. Some revolutions are seen to start with a bang,...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.