The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Transcription"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Transcription found 82 posts

October 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He proposes teaching COTILLONS in the newest taste.” The South Carolina Newspapers collection available via Accessible Archives is an invaluable resource for producing...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Oct 2020

Getting to Know John Balshaw – Part 4

This is the fourth in a short series of posts on my research into John Balshaw’s Jig. It’s a short ‘musical comedy’ written by a man in Brindle, Lancashire, in the mid-seventeenth century.  I found the manuscript in the British...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 26 Jun 2020

Our New Year’s Resolution: More Searchable Recipe Manuscripts

The year 2019 ended with some exciting news. Six new recipe manuscript transcriptions have now been vetted and uploaded into LUNA’s Folger Manuscript Transcription Collections.  This now makes recipes from 49 different manuscripts made searchable...
From: emroc on 31 Dec 2019

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Two weeks ago the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) hosted their fifth annual Transcribathon. I want to share my Transcribathon experience at the site hosted by the Newberry Library in Chicago, as I learned this event...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2019

Remember, remember the fifth of November

The Early Modern Recipes Online Collective transcribathon for 2019 is coming soon… November 5! Flex those fingers, boot up your computer, and get ready to join in, because this is no ordinary transcribathon. Please join EMROC for our fifth annual...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2019

Constructing authentic student textual authority: Teach a text you don’t know

By Christina Riehman-Murphy, Marissa Nicosia, and Heather Froehlich Could a small recipe transcription project make space for student contributions to broader public knowledge? How could we facilitate our students situating themselves as part of a community...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2019

Recipe Books as Digital Feminist Archives

By Whitney Sperazza, Rochester Institute of Technology For sixteen weeks last fall, twelve University of Kansas students from a wide range of disciplines met at the Spencer Research Library to study, transcribe, and develop projects on one object from...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Sep 2019

Continued evidence of interest in Great Parchment Book and the history of the Plantation

The Great Parchment Book blog has been rather quiet over the last few months, but that’s not to say that interest in the content and the project has declined. To the contrary, the Great Parchment Book continues to prove relevant to research in...
From: The Great Parchment Book on 9 Nov 2018

18 EMROC Transcribathon!

Today’s the day; Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) is hosting their annual Transcribathon! This year, they’re working with a late-seventeenth-century cookbook by Jane Dawson, from the Folger Library.   We invite all Recipes...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Sep 2018

Teaching Transcribathons and Experiential Learning

On September 18th, EMROC is holding its annual Transcribathon. In this post, Liza Blake offers some expert–and excellent–advice on hosting a Transcribathon event in your class or institution. Liza Blake As we all prepare for the next EMROC...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Sep 2018

Teaching Transcribathons and Experiential Learning

By Liza Blake This post is one of seven scheduled to appear in The Recipes Project’s upcoming September Teaching Series, which focuses on new ideas and strategies for teaching with recipes. As we all prepare for the next EMROC Transcribathon …...
From: emroc on 21 Aug 2018

Breaking News…

Recipe enthusiasts, please mark your calendar for September 18! The Early Modern Recipes Online Collective will be hosting its annual transcribathon and you can join in virtually. Interested in learning how to read early modern handwriting? Just want...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Jun 2018

International interest in Great Parchment Book continues

  International interest in the Great Parchment Book continues unabated and here we share two recent connections with projects and programmes in France and Finland. Les rescapés du feu Colleagues in France were very interested to...
From: The Great Parchment Book on 5 Dec 2017

Archive work in the British Library – the way I work

At the end of September I went down to London to hear a paper by Chris Marsh at the Royal Historical Society, so I took the opportunity to travel down a bit ahead of time and spend the afternoon in the British Library.  This is something I haven’t...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Dec 2017

Recipe transcribathon time!

We are delighted to announce the third annual recipe transcribathon, hosted by the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective. Fancy taking a dip into some seventeenth-century recipes? Learning a bit about reading old handwriting? And participating in a wider...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Oct 2017

XML dataset of Great Parchment Book now available

LMA and UCL are pleased to announce that an open access set of 326 XML documents containing encoded transcriptions of the individual folios of the Great Parchment Book is now available via UCL Discovery.   Patricia Stewart transcribing a folio ...
From: The Great Parchment Book on 7 Aug 2017

Teaching Chocolate from the Bean to Drink

By Amy L. Tigner Making chocolate from bean to bar has become fashionable both in cottage industries, such as the delightful husband and wife shop, El Buen Cacaco, in Idyllwild, California that creates a wickedly hot Ghost Chocolate Bar made with...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Jul 2017

EMROC News from the Renaissance Society of America Conference

Written by Hillary Nunn The Renaissance Society of American conference this spring showcased a fantastic series of presentations involving EMROC members and their research. Recipes were a real presence during the Chicago meeting, as were digital projects...
From: emroc on 23 May 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.