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Search Results for "Trinity"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Trinity found 92 posts

Happy Birthday William Shakespeare 23 April 2021

Flowers for Shakespeare’s Birthday at Holy Trinity Church 2021 “I would I had some flowers of the spring” Today, 23 April, is William Shakespeare’s Birthday. I’ve already been down to Holy Trinity Church where he was baptised...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Apr 2021

Public talk: “Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper – 3rd December 2019

“Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper . Tuesday 3rd December 2019, at 5pm,  in the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin   As part of the Whitfield...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Nov 2019

CFP – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception – conference at Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College Dublin 24-25 April 2020 Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 1 Aug 2019

Births, baptisms and burials

An Elizabethan baptism I wrote in 2014 about the documentary records of Shakespeare’s baptism at Holy Trinity Church on 26 April 1564. There’s a lot of confusion about the actual date of Shakespeare’s birth, but at the time it was the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Apr 2019

Conference at Trinity Dublin: Borderlines XXIII programme

We’ve finalised the programme for Borderlines Conference 2019, held at Trinity College, Dublin. Click the link for the Borderlines Programme to see the range of fantastic papers set to be presented. Looking forward to seeing you all at the end of...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 15 Apr 2019

Retracing Alexander Hamilton’s Steps Through the Remnants of Revolutionary New York

When Alexander Hamilton arrived in New York in the early 1770s, the city was already the one of the largest in the colonies, second... The post Retracing Alexander Hamilton’s Steps Through the Remnants of Revolutionary New York appeared first on...

Shakespeare’s “Pericles” at the Lir, Dublin

From the Lir website. This new contemporary adaptation of Pericles at The Lir Academy turns William Shakespeare’s classical tale into a modern-day take on the refugee crisis, in a story of resilience and hope. When Antiochus, the malign ruler of...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 31 Jan 2019

Tales from the archives: Love and the Longevity of Charms

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. There’s been a lot of blogging on this platform, and we are so grateful to all our wonderful contributors. But with so much material on the site, it’s easy for earlier pieces to...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Jul 2018

Shakespeare and Neuroscience, Trinity Long Room Hub, 24 May 2018

24 May 2018 | 16:00 – 18:00  Trinity Long Room Hub Shakespeare & Neuroscience Public lecture by Professor Amy Cook whose book Shakespearean Neuroplay uses Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a test subject and cognitive linguistic theory...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 16 May 2018

We fly by night on ‘the wings of love’… to Hull

Around midnight, or just shortly thereafter, Miss Mary Burton crept out of her father’s house at Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, into the waiting arms of her lover, William Fields, a draper from Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire. William must have...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Apr 2018

Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies

By Véronique Soreau Charms are incantations or magic spells, chanted, recited, or written. Used to cure diseases, they can also be a type of medical recipe.[1]  Such recipes were often described as charms in their title and linked to a ritualistic...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Feb 2018

A Brief Christmas Break

A brief Christmas break and then it’s right back to Save-the-Phillips-Library-for-Salem business! But I had a very visual Christmas so I wanted to post some pictures. We were a party of only 6 adults this year, and so we decided to divide our holiday...
From: streets of salem on 26 Dec 2017

Irish Renaissance Seminar meeting, TCD, 18 November, 1–4.30pm

The next biannual meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar will be held at Trinity College Dublin on Saturday, 18 November 2017 at 1–4.30pm. Full details will be posted shortly!
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 8 Nov 2017

Lecture: “Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting”, TCD, 9 November, 1pm

“Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting” Thursday, 9 November 2017, 1 – 2pm Trinity Long Room Hub Presented by Dr Deborah Thorpe Visiting Marie Sklodowska-­Curie Fellow, Trinity Long Room...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 6 Nov 2017

Lecture: “Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman”, TCD, 7 November, 6.30pm

Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman Tuesday, 7 November 2017, 6:30 – 8pm Trinity College Long Room Hub This lecture is part of a series entitled “Beyond the Book of Kells: The stories of eight other medieval manuscripts from...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 6 Nov 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.