The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Venice"

Showing 1 - 20 of 179

Your search for posts with tags containing Venice found 179 posts

Neri's Travels

 “Roma,” Antonio Neri,from Tesoro del Mondo (Neri 1598–1600).The length and breadth of Antonio Neri's travels are far greater in thumbnail biographies and off hand remarks than can be substantiated by actual documentation. While...
From: Conciatore on 1 Feb 2021

Don Giovanni de' Medici

 Don Giovanni di Cosimo I de' MediciIn July of 1621, a man lay dying in his bed, in his palazzo on Murano, the glassmaker's island in Venice. This fifty-four year old had recently become a father and his wife Livia was expecting a second child, but...
From: Conciatore on 29 Jan 2021

What Goes Around Comes Around

 The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher...
From: Conciatore on 11 Jan 2021

Ultramarine Blue

 Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could...
From: Conciatore on 25 Dec 2020

Would you survive four radical political changes? Venetians in the early 19th century tried

If you think that you live in a rapidly changing society, consider the people who lived during the revolutionary and Napoleonic period. Napoleon I as king of Italy by Andrea Appiani. (Wikimedia commons) In 1797 the French army led by general Bonaparte...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 17 Dec 2020

Report from Parnassus

 Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 27 Nov 2020

Fabergé and Purpurine

 Fabergé c.1900. Purpurine cherries,nephrite leaves, gold stalk, rock crystal pot.Peter Carl Fabergé is known the world over for producing elaborate jeweled fantasy eggs for the Russian royal family in the late nineteenth and early...
From: Conciatore on 9 Nov 2020

A Salamander in the Furnace

 From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 28 Oct 2020

Smuggling Glassblowers

 Berkshire Glass Works cane from 1878 –Charles Flint collection. These were novelty items made by glassworkers after hours.(hollow, filled with the fine quality sand of the area)Since early days, the technical aspects of making and...
From: Conciatore on 2 Sep 2020

Ultramarine Blue

 Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could...
From: Conciatore on 14 Aug 2020

The Man Who Liked Books Too Much

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 7 Aug 2020

Rosichiero Glass

Sunset over Venice(click image to enlarge)The most famous glass recipe in Antonio Neri’s 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, is “#129 Transparent Red.” The reason for its notoriety is, of course, the pure gold used as a pigment. Gold-ruby,...
From: Conciatore on 29 Jul 2020

Washing Molten Glass

Washing, sorting and carrying culletDenis Diderot 1772One of the continuing frustrations with the study of glassmaker Antonio Neri, is that there is no known example of his glass to be found anywhere. It is very possible that pieces do survive, but so...
From: Conciatore on 15 Jul 2020

Neri's Travels

“Roma,” Antonio Neri,from Tesoro del Mondo (Neri 1598–1600).The length and breadth of Antonio Neri's travels are far greater in thumbnail biographies and off hand remarks than can be substantiated by actual documentation. While stories...
From: Conciatore on 17 Jun 2020

What Goes Around Comes Around

The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher Bauernkrieg....
From: Conciatore on 10 Jun 2020

Early American Glass Blowers

Berkshire Glass Works cane from 1878 –Charles Flint collection. These were novelty items made by glassworkers after hours.(hollow, filled with the fine quality sand of the area)Since early days, the technical aspects of making and manipulating...
From: Conciatore on 6 Apr 2020

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 28 Feb 2020

Ultramarine Blue

Scrovegni  Chapel, PaduaFrescos and ultramarine ceiling, Giotto 1306.In his fifteenth century handbook for painters, Cennino Cennini said, "Ultramarine blue is a color illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colors; one could not...
From: Conciatore on 21 Feb 2020

Cyclone Rep’s Shakespeare Sessions – celebrating 10 years of Theatre-in-Education

Guest report by Edel Carmody, Cyclone Rep Theatre Company  This year marks the tenth anniversary since the creation of Cyclone Rep’s Shakespeare Sessions. Cyclone Rep is Ireland’s leading Shakespearean Theatre-in-Education Company. We...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Feb 2020

Report from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 6 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.