The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Victorians"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Victorians found 36 posts

A Victorian View of Salem Witchcraft

I had not thought about the prolific and pioneering author Harriet Martineau (1802-1876) for years: until I encountered a portrait of her by the Salem artist Charles Osgood in the Catalog of Portraits at the Essex Institute (1936). I was looking...
From: streets of salem on 29 Aug 2020

Travel and Quarantine in the 19th Century

Amongst the many impacts of COVID-19 has been the devastation of the travel industry, and its knock-on effects on the global economy. We are all having to think carefully about the ways we travel, not only internationally, but even around our own countries...
From: DrAlun on 29 May 2020

Beard Sculpting in the 19th Century.

Over the course of the past four or five years or so, one of the biggest growth areas in the personal grooming industry has been in products for cleaning, styling, or beautifying the beard. A whole host of options are now available, including beard oils,...
From: DrAlun on 18 Mar 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Interpreting Thrift through Victorian Food Writing

By Lindsay Middleton When you use ‘thrift’ in conversations today, the word carries connotations of frugality and, perhaps, tightfistedness. In mid- to late-nineteenth century, however, the meaning of ‘thrift’ was being reinvigorated....
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2020

Turkey Figs

I was researching the major tea importers and purveyors in Salem in light of the upcoming anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, but another commodity kept popping up in the sources: turkey figs. I didn’t look at any customs records, but...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2019

Uncovered: The First ever Beard and Moustache Competition?!

Last week, hordes of hirsute men descended upon Antwerp in hopes of securing a prize at the World Beard and Moustache Championships. This has become a major event, attracting thousands of entrants, and headlines all across the world. It has also...
From: DrAlun on 21 May 2019

Streets of North Adams

I found myself in the western Massachusetts city of North Adams on this past Saturday morning, having driven across the state to sit on a panel for an honors thesis defense at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts the day before. I love the Berkshires,...
From: streets of salem on 7 May 2019

What About Whiskers? The forgotten facial hair fashion of 19th-century Britain.

In 1843, an article appeared in the New Orleans ‘Picayune’ newspaper, titled ‘Whiskers. Or, a clean shave’. Dwelling on their utility as ‘ornamental appendages to the human face’, the authors sought to discuss how they...
From: DrAlun on 21 Jun 2017

To Lop or Not

Happy Easter weekend to everyone, and Patriots’ Day to those of us in Massachusetts: I’m traveling next week, so will leave you with some rabbits, for Easter and just because. Not the common variety, mind you, but the “fancy”,...
From: streets of salem on 16 Apr 2017

Ceramics for Shakespeare

We have recently acquired for the museum collection a set of six ceramic tiles showing scenes from Shakespeare’s plays. Designed by John Moyr Smith, the tiles were produced by Minton’s Ceramics towards the end of the 19th century and reflect...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 9 Nov 2016

Announcing…’The Age of the Beard”

I’m delighted to be able to announce the launch, in November 2016, of the exhibition linked to my Wellcome Trust project on the history of facial hair in Britain. Between Mid November and March 2017, the Florence Nightingale Museum in London will...
From: DrAlun on 5 Oct 2016

Shakespeare Simplified

The Shakespeare400 happenings were in full swing yesterday, in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death: April 23 is always a big Shakespeare day because it is the accepted date of his birth and the actual date of his death, and...
From: streets of salem on 24 Apr 2016

A Letter in defence of “Strong-Minded Females” written in 19th-century Sheffield

Meet Aunt Dorothy, a Victorian woman living in Sheffield who advised her nephew against chastising “strong-minded” women. I am currently undertaking a large scoping exercise at Sheffield Archives on behalf of the School of English at the University...

Visiting speaker, 24 Mar 2015: Gowan Dawson on citizen science in the 19th and 21st centuries

Gowan Dawson (University of Leicester) will be presenting his paper, ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 24 March 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s...
From: CRECS// on 20 Mar 2015

Ripper Street Season Three   Recently updated !

It’s hard to believe that just a year has passed since the end of the second season of Ripper Street and the terrible news that the stupid BBC had decided to cancel what was one of the best series on television. Thankfully all of the resultant fuss...
From: Madame Guillotine on 2 Jan 2015

A Real Life Sherlock – Guest post by Angela Buckley

On the evening of 6 December 1886, Arthur Foster left the Queen’s Theatre, Manchester, with a pocket full of gold and a bejewelled lady on his arm. He hailed a hansom cab and as the couple settled into the carriage, a shadowy figure slipped in beside...
From: Madame Guillotine on 21 Nov 2014

Catherine Eddowes and Kosminski

It seems like Jack the Ripper is back in the news again in a rather big way, which is jolly nice for me as, like Russell Edwards, who is responsible for the latest furore, I also have a book to promote. I wasn’t actually planning to blog about...
From: Madame Guillotine on 8 Sep 2014

The Anaesthetized Queen & the Path to Painless Childbirth

‘Did the epidural hurt?’ I ask Rebecca Rideal—editor of The History Vault—one morning as we sit outside the British Library. ‘Not really.’ She hesitates, clearly wanting to say more without divulging too much information. ‘I mean, it’s...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 15 Aug 2014

The Double Casket of Thomas & Mary Souder

I remember rummaging through an old trunk in my grandmother’s house when I was a child and coming across what seemed to me at the time a very unusual photograph. It was a monochromatic image of a beautiful, young woman lying in a white casket (not dissimilar...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 4 Jun 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.