The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Virginia"

Showing 1 - 20 of 263

Your search for posts with tags containing Virginia found 263 posts

The Revolutionary War Service of James Noble

When old Revolutionary War soldiers applied for their military pensions in the first and second quarter of the nineteenth century, they generally reported the... The post The Revolutionary War Service of James Noble appeared first on Journal of the American...

Windows into the Past

With warmer weather and the completion of my manuscript, I’ve been out on the Salem streets more, but every time I’m on a lovely walk I see some horrible structure that makes me run home: it’s not just the new big buildings but also...
From: streets of salem on 27 Mar 2021

Consuming History—Or Are We?

By Marie Pellissier  I’ve always been fascinated by the appeal of food in living history museums—the sound and aromas of someone cooking over an iron stove or open hearth never fails to draw visitors’ attention. Since I moved to...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Feb 2021

“Thrown into this Hospitable Land”: Saint-Dominguans in Virginia, 1796-187

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Frances Bell In October 1809, a Frenchman...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Jan 2021

January

Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A mulatto man slave named AARON, who brought suit against my father, Henry Randolph, in the General Court.” Some historians and other scholars...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Jan 2021

The Well of Loneliness on trial: the government vs Radclyffe Hall

On November 9, 1928 Bow Street Magistrates Court was crowded. DH Lawrence’s The Rainbow had been successfully prosecuted for obscenity in the same courtroom 13 years earlier. Now it was the turn of The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall. The perceived...
From: Mathew Lyons on 21 Dec 2020

Nat Turner’s slave revolt

Nat Turner was born into slavery on a Virginia plantation, on 2 October 1800. Convinced from an early age that he was a prophet, Turner taught himself to read and write. His spiritual path mirrors that of other mystics: he maintained an austere life apart...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Nov 2020

Great Bridge Museum Opens Amid Pandemic

Friday, June 19, 2020, proved an interesting day in Virginia. The governor, two days prior, issued an executive order declaring June 19, “Juneteenth” a... The post Great Bridge Museum Opens Amid Pandemic appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Constitutional Convention Debates the Electoral College

In the last two decades, the Electoral College has come under harsh, though derivative, criticism as a result of the presidential elections in 2000... The post The Constitutional Convention Debates the Electoral College appeared first on Journal of the...

The Connolly Plot

During the Revolutionary War, Pittsburgh was a place of constant political and economic intrigue, double-dealing, subversion, back-stabbing, disloyalty, and treachery. One of the earliest... The post The Connolly Plot appeared first on Journal of the...

The American Revolution in Alexandria, Virginia: Upheaval in George Washington’s Hometown

Alexandria, Virginia, is well known as George Washington’s hometown, but its role during the American Revolution is not widely understood. Like the rest of... The post The American Revolution in Alexandria, Virginia: Upheaval in George Washington’s...

September 6

“TOUT A LA MODE.” George Lafong introduced himself to the ladies and gentlemen of Williamsburg as a “French HAIR-DRESSER” in an advertisement in the September 6, 1770, edition of William Rind’s Virginia Gazette.  Apparently,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Sep 2020

The Founding of Thomas Jefferson’s University

The Founding of Thomas Jefferson’s University, edited by John A. Ragosta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy, (University of Virginia Press, 2019). Revered... The post The Founding of Thomas Jefferson’s University appeared first...

July 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “He purposes to return to this LAND of LIBERTY.” In the summer of 1770, William Wylie, a watchmaker, took to the pages of William Rind’s Virginia Gazette to...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jul 2020

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

June 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “This mill was erected principally with a view of encouraging our own manufactures.” Although advertisements promoting local industry and encouraging “domestic...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Jun 2020

George Rogers Clark and William Croghan

George Rogers Clark and William Croghan: A Story of the Revolution, Settlement, and Early Life at Locust Grove by Gwynne Tuell Potts (Lexington: University Press... The post George Rogers Clark and William Croghan appeared first on Journal of the...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.