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Search Results for "Year of Shakespeare"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Year of Shakespeare found 38 posts

Where did Shakespeare’s money come from (Part 2)?

Where did Shakespeare’s money come from (Part 2)? By Dr David Fallow In an earlier post, Dr Robert Bearman put over the traditionally received view of where Shakespeare’s money came from, and how he made it. Here, Dr David Fallow, an economic...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 18 Apr 2016

Where did Shakespeare’s money come from?

Where did Shakespeare’s money come from? In a two-part blog, for the Royal Mint, we thought it would be good to ask two experts who have very different views about Shakespeare and how he made his money… By Dr Robert Bearman, former Former...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 18 Apr 2016

Introducing: Shakespeare on the Global Stage

Busy but exciting times — some of you know that for the past several years I’ve been working on a project exploring Shakespeare’s presence in the 2012 London Olympics. At the end of January, the final installment of this research was...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 16 Feb 2015

Technology and the Book

In my last post I mentioned the fact that an essay of mine has recently been published in Shakespeare and the Digital World, a new book edited by Christie Carson and Peter Kirwan for Cambridge University Press. I received my contributor copies in the...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 7 Jul 2014

Digital Shakespeare: asking questions about the future

Earlier this week I attended a day of discussions at the University of Nottingham on  Digital Shakespeare, with the subtitle authorship and authority. One of a series of workshops, practitioners and academics were there to share ideas and discuss the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jul 2013

Taking Hamlet to the world: Dominic Dromgoole’s “lunatic idea”

Dominic Dromgoole You have to hand it to Dominic Dromgoole, the Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe: he’s not afraid of a challenge. Looking to beat the 2012 Globe to Globe Festival project, his latest scheme is to take Hamlet on World...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Jul 2013

Reviewing Shakespeare Webinar

On Monday this week, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust hosted a webinar, ‘Reviewing Shakespeare’, an in-depth discussion I had with Dr Paul Prescott (University of Warwick) about how and why we review Shakespearian productions. What makes a...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 10 May 2013

Reviewing Shakespeare: A Webinar

Why should we review theatre? What makes a good theatre review? Do we dare to speak the truth about what we see? Join us for a free webinar on ‘Reviewing Shakespeare’ sponsored by Bloomsbury Publishing. It’s on Monday 6 May at 4.00pm...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Apr 2013

Re-living A Year of Shakespeare

Last spring we launched A Year of Shakespeare – an energetic record and review of all 73 productions which took place in the World Shakespeare Festival. Today, those reviews, by 30 international contributors, are published as A Year of Shakespeare:...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 11 Apr 2013

Year of Shakespeare: Henry VIII (All is True)

Photo: Ellie KurttzDirected by Ernesto Arias for Fundación Siglo de Oro (Spain) for Shakespeare’s Globe, London. The Globe to Globe festival made a notoriously misinformed claim in its subtitle: ‘37 plays, 37 languages.’ Three Spanish-speaking...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 13 Oct 2012

The Plays We Overlook: Henry VI Part Two

Heavens to betsy! No sooner do I announce that I’m going to write a series of posts on Shakespeare’s neglected plays, starting with the Henry VI trilogy, than these three plays get more attention than they have in decades. First, the Balkan productions...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 5 Oct 2012

The Plays We Overlook: Henry VI Part One

Falconetti and Antonin Artaud in Dreyer’s “Passion of Joan of Arc”Can you guess who said the following about Henry VI Part One? ‘All critics, all readers, will probably agree or have agreed that it is one of the least poetical...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 4 Oct 2012

Year of Shakespeare: Stratford Workshop – Cultural Identity and Cultural Politics in the WSF

This post is part of Year of Shakespeare, a project documenting the World Shakespeare Festival, the greatest celebration of Shakespeare the world has ever seen.   On 13 September twenty-five academics, theatre practitioners, educators, and students...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 30 Sep 2012

Year of Shakespeare: King Lear at the Almeida

This post is part of Year of Shakespeare, a project documenting the World Shakespeare Festival, the greatest celebration of Shakespeare the world has ever seen.   King Lear, directed by Michael Attenborough for the Almeida Theatre, 22 September...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Sep 2012

Islet of Wonder

‘O Brave New World’ - Atmospheres of the Tempest A Retz production, www.retz.co.uk January to July 2012 297 Hoxton Street, London N1, Hoxton Gardens and the Grand Union Canal   Reviewed by Polly Mortimer   This fantastical production...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Sep 2012

Year of Shakespeare: Stratford Workshop – The WSF beyond London and Stratford

This post is part of Year of Shakespeare, a project documenting the World Shakespeare Festival, the greatest celebration of Shakespeare the world has ever seen.   On 13 September twenty-five academics, theatre practitioners, educators, and students...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 24 Sep 2012

Year of Shakespeare: When Shakespeare is deprived of his tongue

Language is a primary signifier of class and social status; Shakespeare employs linguistic nuance to draw out the relationships between characters in each play. In the postcolonial Indian context, the overlays of languages spoken are manifold, and equally...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Sep 2012

Year of Shakespeare: Stratford Workshop – Representing History in the WSF

This post is part of Year of Shakespeare, a project documenting the World Shakespeare Festival, the greatest celebration of Shakespeare the world has ever seen.   On 13 September twenty-five academics, theatre practitioners, educators, and students...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 21 Sep 2012

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.