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Your search for posts with tags containing academic writing found 37 posts

Curating; or, building the manuscript inde

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. The, at the...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 9 Dec 2019

Keep Calm and R&R

It’s August, and for academics hoping to get some writing done this summer, it’s go time. In conversations with my writing group colleagues, who come from fields as diverse as information sciences, business, community health, and religion,...
From: The Junto on 6 Aug 2019

Litigious virtue; or, preparing the book manuscript

The two hardest parts of writing a book for me has been project design and the daily starting line.[1] The design for the book’s research question was a fraught process that took nearly two years of graduate school. It is in this aspect that I think...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 27 Jul 2019

‘Membering: or, a look at revising a book

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. I am now two-thirds through my own revision process before final submission, having...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 22 Jul 2019

Perpetual Motion: Fantasies of Technology, Slavery, and History

Once we stop thinking of the past as a failed but noble attempt at the present, many of its inexplicable, repulsive, or ridiculous aspects take on a new colour. A good example is alchemical transmutation, an evident impossibility that nevertheless occupied...
From: memorious on 24 Jun 2018

May Blogroll: Book Myths Edition, Vol. 1

Dear reader, This month, I return to reflecting on the academic book proposal process. In previous posts I provided a bibliography of all the advice out there on this process, as well as how to identify a book series as a means of narrowing your target...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 1 May 2018

April Blogroll: Desk Top Edition

¶ Dear readers: ¶ One of the few things I felt I was certain of when I got my tenure-track job was that I would upgrade my home desk. True, she was the easiest thing to move, comprised of two industrial, cross-hatched legs topped by a black...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 1 Apr 2018

March Blogroll: Book Series Edition

¶ Dear readers: ¶ I’m lucky. I’ve never had too much trouble with “killing my darlings” when it comes to writing. I can’t stand my first drafts and am typically eager to get to revising stages. ¶ I’m...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 1 Mar 2018

Since I was young, I have been curious

“Why does every PhD applicant start their essay with ‘since I was young, I have been curious’?” This question, asked on Twitter today,  is an interesting one. As a fairly frequent reader of applications, I will confess...
From: memorious on 5 Jan 2018

How to Start Your Thesis

Jerry Bannister Starting a graduate thesis is hard. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying, delusional, or one of those bizarre people who find it easy. December in Canada brings awful holiday specials on TV, complaints about freezing rain and, for those...
From: Borealia on 11 Dec 2017

Should you write your dissertation as a book?

Impostor syndrome comes in many forms in academia, and this is how it comes for me: I shouldn’t be a doctor, because I never wrote a dissertation. I just wrote a book. It’s not that I regret the choice. But since that book came out, I’ve...
From: The Junto on 30 Oct 2017

Empathy for the Devil

The idea that “Tout comprendre, c’est tout pardonner” has never convinced me. Explanation is not vindication; it’s often the opposite. Historical analysis does not always or even usually result in more sympathetic characters. And...
From: memorious on 4 Oct 2017

How to Finish Your Thesis

Jerry Bannister Writing is hard. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying, delusional, or one of those utterly bizarre people who find it easy. June in Canada brings dandelions, complaints about the weather, and, for those of us in universities, thoughts...
From: Borealia on 8 Jun 2017

What’s the Use of History? A Postscript

Having already devoted my two last posts to John Pepall’s attack on “university historians”, I don’t wish to go on beating a dead horse. But inasmuch as I find his take on the nature of history’s relevance...
From: memorious on 25 May 2017

What’s the Use of History? Part

Continued from here. For Pepall, then, the relevance of history to any member of the public is rooted explicitly, indeed exclusively, in that person’s identity — an identity conceived, moreover, in terms of birth, nation, and a kind of...
From: memorious on 19 May 2017

What’s the Use of History?

So asks John Pepall in the current issue of the Dorchester Review. Not that he really thinks there’s any question. As he informs us on page one, The use of history, the only use of history, is its being known and understood by the general...
From: memorious on 18 May 2017

Now in Paperback: The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Moderate self-promotion alert: I’m happy to say that the paperback edition of this book will be out early next month. My own very modest contribution is a chapter on Restoration Ireland (1660-1688). I’m grateful to the editor, Alvin Jackson,...
From: memorious on 17 May 2017

The Dreaded Second Book

Forgive the self-indulgence of a post about my writing; but it’s my birthday, and I’ll cry if I want to. The hiatus in posts here began as a way of dealing with grading and continued as I shifted gears to the early summer “return to...
From: memorious on 10 May 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.