The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "digital humanities"

Showing 1 - 20 of 460

Your search for posts with tags containing digital humanities found 460 posts

Teaching Renaissance Studies Online

High school teachers have been confronting the difficulties of teaching History and Social Sciences online over the past year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. These subjects are incredibly complicated, requiring the use of images and maps to teach teenage...

The Gunpowder-Treason: with a discourse of the manner of its discovery

Go straight to the scanned book Although this work was published many years after the events it describes, and its main content is reprinted, it also contains the first printing of a number of letters relating to the plot. It is not a scarce...

Séminaire : « Patrimoine et humanités numériques. Regards croisés entre archéologie et conservation-restauration des biens culturels » (En ligne, 13 avril 2021)

  Séminaire Digital Humanities / Artificial Intelligence (DHAI). Séance : « Patrimoine et humanités numériques. Regards croisés entre archéologie et conservation-restauration des biens culturels »....
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 3 Apr 2021

A New World Map Innovates

A new world map may transform the way we look at the earth. This map is a two-dimensional double-sided disk centered on the earth’s poles. Major innovations in the history of cartography are difficult to achieve, despite new digital tools such...

Postal Perspectives, Salem Edition

I was enthralled this week with news of the new technology which has unlocked “letterlocked” letters from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: before the onset of the envelope in the nineteenth century there were often-intricate practices...
From: streets of salem on 6 Mar 2021

New Digital Humanities Techniques Open Locked Letters

Early modern writers sometimes employed letterlocking in order to close letters securely using complex practices of folding, cutting, inserting tabs, and sewing. The New York Times reports: “In an era before sealed envelopes, this technique,...

A True Copy of the Journal of the High Court of Justice, for the Trial of K. Charles I.

Frontispiece This full-page frontispiece is prefaced by the following poem: These lines speak for themselves, describing “Albion” as “Three Nations doom’d t’eternal slavery”, symbolized by the figures crushed...

A 15th-century manuscript book of hours

This week’s book scan is a bit different from my usual fare. It’s a manuscript, it’s from the 15th century, it’s not primarily related to suffering and – because of the limitations of OCR (optical character reader) software...

Annotation in scholarly editions and research

It has been, alas, almost exactly a year since our last face-to-face Besterman Workshop at 99 Banbury Road. Of course, webinars allow more people to join, and to do so, most importantly, from the comfort of their homes, where they can sit comfortably...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Feb 2021

Digital Humanities Confronts Cubism

Digital Humanities methods are increasingly used in humanities research, teaching, and presentation through a myriad of techniques. Digital tools and methods offer possibilities of analyzing texts, images, objects, and artifacts in different ways...

MAURUS SCOTT, CATHOLIC MARTYR (SCANNED DOCUMENT)

It’s a common enough tale, I suppose. Young man goes to Cambridge, studies law, goes to the inner Temple to complete his training, gets converted to Catholicism and ends up being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. Maurus Scott was one of...

Who printed Piquet for Francis Cogan? Thank you Compositor!

Last week, I watched Joseph Hone present a paper 'Secrets, Lies, and Title Pages' (now available on YouTube) sponsored by ODSECS, the Open Digital Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies. Joseph discussed how 18c printers "corrupted title pages with false...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 25 Jan 2021

Digitizing Early Modern Suffering

I finally splashed out on a CZUR overhead scanner, which I picked up at a substantial discount from the regular market price. I strongly recommend anyyone to get one of these. Forget that dishwasher you were saving up for, or the new hairdryer...

Historians Criticize “1776 Report”

“Historians responded with dismay and anger Monday after the White House’s ‘1776 Commission’ released a report that it said would help Americans better understand the nation’s history by ‘restoring patriotic education.'”...

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

It is more important than ever to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day this year and to remember his vital work for racial equality and social justice. The killing of George Floyd and so many other African Americans over the past year has underscored...

Rejoice! for eebo tcp phase 2 is now in the public domain

Here it is! Something tangible and irrefutable, something that makes 2021 better than 2020 (not that that would be hard!), something to cheer the spirit and warm the cocckles of the heart. Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership Phase 2 is...

Appel à publication : Digital Art History Journal #7: Art History in a Global Network?

Digital Art History Journal #7: Art History in a Global Network? Deadline: Jan 31, 2021 Zonas de Contacto: Art History in a Global Network? Digital technologies have catalyzed globalization; yet, the precarity of global networks has become increasingly...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 19 Nov 2020

Digitising the margins: a classification of Voltaire’s scribbles

The most famous squiggly lines relating to eighteenth-century writing are almost certainly to be found in Tristram Shandy. Sterne uses them to illustrate the non-linearity of stories (see about halfway down that page) and digressions from the main narrative,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Nov 2020

Page 1 of 23123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.