The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "economy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing economy found 187 posts

“At the time the said Horse and Sulky was furnished”

The challenges of managing Lt. Col. Abijah Brown drew me away from the episode that initially drew my attention to him—Col. Richard Gridley’s 1786 request to the Continental Congress to reimburse him for the cost of a horse killed at Bunker...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2021

“The Horse so furnished was Killed at the Battle”

Yesterday I discussed Richard Gridley’s petitions to the post-war Continental Congress to keep compensating him for the loss of his Crown pension from the previous wars. Both Gridley and the Congress were caught in the 1780s economy, when there...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2021

Col. Gridley’s Half-Pay

Last year I wrote two postings about Maj. Scarborough Gridley’s attempt to wring some money from the Continental government after he was cashiered from his own father’s regiment in September 1775. In the same period Scar Gridley’s father,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Apr 2021

Not a Podcast Recommendation

I recently stumbled across the podcast “The American War: Britain’s American Revolution,” which is not actually a podcast. It’s the recordings of five sessions of a conference at the Huntington Library years ago. But those are...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Apr 2021

A Raid on “a place called Paramus”

On 23 Mar 1780, Ens. George Eld of the Coldstream Guards’ light infantry company again went into battle against the rebels surrounding New York City again.I’ve used Eld’s diary, published by the Boston Public Library, as a source for...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Mar 2021

“Adventurous Wives” Conference via Chawton House

Chawton House is an Elizabethan manor once owned by Jane Austen’s brother. It houses the research library of the Centre for the Study of Early Women’s Writing, 1600–1830.In that capacity, Chawton House will host an online conference...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2021

“Revolutionary Harbor” Discussion, 17 Feb.

On Wednesday, 17 February, the National Parks of Boston and Boston Harbor Now will host an online discussion on “Revolutionary Harbor: The Transatlantic World of Peter Faneuil,” about the role of slavery in shaping Boston’s eighteenth-century...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2021

Robert Macaire and the Code Civil: The Political Economy of French Theatre after Bonaparte

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Klaas Tindemans In 1823, under the restored...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Jan 2021

A “very Cheerfull” Christmas at the Rowes’

The merchant John Rowe was one of Boston’s leading Anglicans, so he celebrated Christmas while his Congregationalist neighbors generally ignored the holiday. Here’s how Rowe described 25 Dec 1770 in his published diary, 250 years ago today:...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Dec 2020

Van Horn on “The Power of Objects,” Plus a Panel on “Caribbean Connections”

Tonight, on Monday, 30 November, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host an online talk by Jennifer Van Horn on “The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America.” The event description says: Over the course of the eighteenth century,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2020

Ebenezer Storer, at Your Service

In December 1774, a few months after Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln’s husband Bela died, a Boston merchant named Ebenezer Storer was also widowed.Storer appears here in a pastel portrait rendered by John Singleton Copley in the late 1760s, now at the Metropolitan...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2020

“Not Made by Slaves”: A Layman’s Political Economy of Ethical Capitalism

By Bronwen Everill Scholars tend to discuss capitalism and slavery either through slavery’s contribution to the investment capital that made industrialization possible;[1] the innovations in long-distance credit and insurance; mortgages that...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Oct 2020

“Considering the Non-importation Agreement to be broke”

By this week in October 1770, 250 years ago, the Boston Whigs knew that the North American non-importation movement had collapsed. As I discussed back here, early that month the Boston Gazette printed a letter from Philadelphia reporting that some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2020

“Revere in Perspective” Symposium, 7-9 Oct.

This week the American Antiquarian Society is hosting a virtual symposium on Paul Revere, with events from Wednesday, 7 October, through Friday, 9 October.Planned in conjunction with the traveling museum exhibit “Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere”...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2020

Daniel R. Mandell on Economic Equality at the A.A.S., 30 Sept.

On Wednesday, 30 September, the American Antiquarian Society will host an online talk by Daniel R. Mandell on “Finding the Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America.”The event announcement:Although Americans today are concerned about...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Sep 2020

The Long History of the Faneuil Hall Name

Boston’s Faneuil Hall is different from most other landmarks and monuments bearing slaveholders’ names because in most cases those sites arose from a later generation choosing to honor a person.Sometimes that act is meant to elevate a local...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Sep 2020

Å Community Discussion about Faneuil Hall

Last month Martin Blatt and David J. Harris wrote an essay in Commonwealth Magazine inviting a public discussion of whether to rename Faneuil Hall. They said:We call upon the city to engage in an expansive community process to decide two issues in sequence—first,...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Sep 2020

“Material Culture of Sugar” Webinar from Historic Deerfield, 26 Sept.

Way back in April, Historic Deerfield was going to host a one-day forum on sugar in early New England culture. But then people recognized the Covid-19 virus had started to spread in this country, and institutions postponed their public events for a few...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2020

The Launch of the Massachusetts Spy

On Tuesday, 7 Aug 1770, 250 years ago today, the second issue of the Massachusetts Spy appeared.The very first issue, dated 17 July, was a test to drum up subscriptions, distributed for free. The printers had projected regular publication to start at...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Aug 2020

August 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A THEFT.” The August 4, 1770, edition of the Providence Gazette included advertisements that promoted consumers goods and services for sale, but it also featured several...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.