The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "england"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1413

Your search for posts with tags containing england found 1413 posts

Ragnar’s Death Song | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK.[1] The History Channel’s Vikings is one of the most popular medievalist television series to date. In the United States alone, the series has, as recently as its fifth series, managed...

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Phillips House

I can’t believe that I’ve been blogging here for eleven+ years and have not featured 1) the only house museum; 2) the only house belonging to Historic New England; and 3) the only house which was (partially) moved to its site on the street where I...
From: streets of salem on 8 Jun 2021

Not Just The Tudors

A few weeks ago I had the great pleasure and privilege of talking about the Dissolution of the Monasteries to Suzannah Lipscomb for her fantastic new podcast series #NotJustTheTudors. Do have a listen! https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-dissolution-of-the-monasteries/id1564113869?i=1000523609608
From: Mathew Lyons on 31 May 2021

Red Meat for Empire: New England Cattle, the British Empire, and the Disruption of Revolution

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Strother...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 May 2021

Freedom comes at a Price: The Medieval History of Bail

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 19 May 2021. On July 1, 2021, Ohio courts are entering into a new age of bail reform. Ohio’s Supreme Court ruled recently that not only must all Ohio counties adopt a uniform monetary bail schedule, but before resorting...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 19 May 2021

April 28

Who were the subjects of advertisements in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “RUN-AWAY … a Negro Man named CUFF … Three Dollars Reward.” “TO BE SOLD, A Negro Man … expert at all husbandry Business.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Apr 2021

The Comic History of the Peasants’ Revolt

For Pen and Sword Books I am producing a new annotated edition of The Comic History of England (originally published in 1846). I thought I’d give readers a taste of what this fine book has to offer. * The Famous Mr Punch In George W.M....

Trouble Brewing: Ale, Beer, and Witchcraft

A new article on The Conversation, which seems to have gained quite a lot of traction, argues that the modern iconography of witchcraft – namely pointed hats, cauldrons, broomsticks, and cats – can be traced to the commercial practices of,...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Mar 2021

Workshop Report: Drugs and Drollery

It was an honour for the Wellcome Collection to join Intoxicating Spaces and a group of eminent scholars for an online workshop that took place on 21–22 January 2021 on Modes of Persuasion: Humour and the Promotion and Control of Intoxicants Past...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 17 Feb 2021

Exits, Entries and the Allure of the Runaway Nun

Guest post by Gwen Seabourne, 17 February 2021. Entries on the rolls of judicial sessions in Yorkshire in 1304 and 1306 tell tales of disturbing events at two of the county’s convents. Representatives of Barkston Ash and the Ainsty informed...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 17 Feb 2021

February 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Wanted, a Negro Woman, that understands all Kinds of Houshold Work.” The Slavery Adverts 250 Project seeks to identify, remediate, and republish every advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Feb 2021

JANE AUSTEN’S SURREY: The Novels as Inspiration by Tony Grant

Inquiring readers: While our world travels have been curtailed during the COVID-19 pandemic, we can think of no better a way to take a tour than with Tony Grant, who has served as a guide in Jane Austen country for many years. Map of Surrey Jane Austen...
From: Jane Austen's World on 13 Feb 2021

Neri's Travels

 “Roma,” Antonio Neri,from Tesoro del Mondo (Neri 1598–1600).The length and breadth of Antonio Neri's travels are far greater in thumbnail biographies and off hand remarks than can be substantiated by actual documentation. While...
From: Conciatore on 1 Feb 2021

Jane Austen and Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary

What dictionary might Jane Austen have consulted? And how did Samuel Johnson undertake the monumental task of putting together a dictionary of the whole English language?
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 Jan 2021

January 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? SlaveryProvidence Gazette (January 12, 1771).“A Likely strong Negro Man.” On January 12, 1771, an advertisement for a “Likely strong Negro Man, about 28 Years...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Jan 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.