The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "food"

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Your search for posts with tags containing food found 900 posts

Say Ohm: Japanese Electric Bread and the Joy of Panko

By Nathan Hopson In 1998, the New York Times introduced readers to an exotic new ingredient described as “a light, airy variety [of breadcrumb] worlds away from the acrid, herb-flecked, additive-laden bread crumbs in the supermarket,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 May 2021

“Spirits of Independence”: Ten Taverns of the Revolutionary War Era

City Tavern in Philadelphia is a reconstruction of the famous eighteenth century tavern where countless patriots—both political and military—met throughout the American Revolution, and... The post “Spirits of Independence”: Ten...

The Curing Chocolate of Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma of 1631

By R.A. Kashanipour “The number of people drink who chocolate is vast,” wrote the seventeenth century Spaniard, Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma, “not only in the Indies, where the beverage originated, but also in Spain, Italy and Flanders,...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2021

Case Study of a Wounded Provincial

At Historical Nerdery, Alexander Cain just shared an essay by Joel Bohy and Douglas D. Scott, who have been studying musket balls and the damage they can cause. In this particular posting, that damage was to the body of John Robbins, who was standing...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2021

From the Long Room to Online Group Tours

Here are a couple more online events coming up this week that caught my eye. On Thursday, 15 April, the Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York will offer “The Long Room: For the Entertainment of Friends and Strangers”, featuring former guest curator...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2021

Profiling Owen Richards’s Attackers

Last night as I finished the posting about Owen Richards taking his attackers to court, I thought, “Who are those men he accused? Who would have more to say about them?”And then I realized that researching bit players in Revolutionary Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2021

Recipes and Memory: Thinking Back

Amanda E. Herbert and Annette E. Herbert Over the past two months, we’ve learned so much about recipes and memory. Sonakshi Srivastava taught us about cities, identity, and the legal as well as cultural ownership of a historic recipe. Lina Perkins...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Mar 2021

My Soda Bread

By Kathleen Lynch There was something wrong about the package that was delivered to me at work one early spring morning years ago. It was addressed to me, and the return address also had my surname. But I didn’t recognize the name as a family member,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Mar 2021

Garcinia Longings

By Rini Barman My digestive tract goes for a toss once seasons are about to change in Assam. I am speaking of that eerie intermediary period when the winds, too, aren’t very sure which direction to follow. With rising temperatures and global warming...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Mar 2021

A Great Tea-Drinking: Collective Memory and Victorian Invalid Cookery

By Bonnie Shishko Midway through Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1853), Esther Summerson relinquishes her beloved role as adopted housekeeper and assumes another: sick nurse. In a tense scene that’s painfully relevant in this era of COVID,...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Mar 2021

Grandma Sloan’s Houska

By Lina Perkins Wilder My family makes houska wrong. Hoska [sic] 2 cakes yeast ¼ c lukewarm water 1 c milk scalded ½ c sugar ¼ c shortening 2 t salt 4 ½-5 c sifted flour 2 T fennel seed 2 eggs ½ c raisins ½ c...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Mar 2021

Of Kebabs and Lawsuits: A Case for Authenti‘city’

By Sonakshi Srivastava Authenticity is a reflexive term, its nature is to be deceptive about its nature. — Carl Dahlhaus There is an instance in Intizar Husain’s popular novel, Basti, where, while dining at the Shiraz, a restaurant in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Mar 2021

Cannibalism in the Kitchen: Jean de Léry’s L’Histoire mémorable de la ville de Sancerre (1574)

By Stephanie Shiflett In 1573, at the height of the Wars of Religion in France, Catholic forces besieged the Protestant town of Sancerre. The author Jean de Léry found himself caught there, watching as supplies dwindled and the populace grew increasingly...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Mar 2021

Remembering, Repeating, and Coming To in Early Modern English Recipes

By Katie Kadue Recipes for food preservation document the fight against oblivion. All recipes are mnemonic: they function both as technical reminders and as records of past practices, passed down as “receipts,” as they were called in early...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Mar 2021

A Long Search for Hercules Posey

At Zagat, the chef and culinary historian Ramin Ganeshram shared the story of her research into Hercules Posey, head cook at Mount Vernon and the Presidential Mansion in Philadelphia until he freed himself from slavery. In this article, Ganeshram describes...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2021

Pächter Torte

By Simon Newman 15 dkg Zucker (15 decagrams sugar) Many of the recipes we use are filled with memories. I use pastry recipes that go back to my grandmother, probably even further. As I make them I remember her and my mother, I remember them making pies...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Feb 2021

Consuming History—Or Are We?

By Marie Pellissier  I’ve always been fascinated by the appeal of food in living history museums—the sound and aromas of someone cooking over an iron stove or open hearth never fails to draw visitors’ attention. Since I moved to...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Feb 2021

Turtles All the Way Down

This advertisement appeared in the 13 Oct 1761 New-York Gazette.Here are some tasty extracts from Washington biographer Alexis Coe’s conversation with Prof. Mary Draper about the background behind this ad: Mary: In the 18th century, colonists throughout...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2021

A Recipe for Music: Notating Domestic Singing in Seventeenth-Century England

By Sarah Koval Mary Chantrell and others, recipe book, f.92v, 1690, MS 1548. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London. Mary Chantrell’s book of recipes for food and medicines (1690) is typical of the manuscript recipe genre: a handwritten, bound book...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Feb 2021

The Circus Origins of Pink Lemonade

By Betsy Golden Kellem Few things whip up an appetite quite like the playground of cotton candy, popcorn, fried food and sweet drinks that accompanies a circus. Pink lemonade in particular has long been associated with the circus, which does not simply...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Feb 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.