The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "manners"

Showing 1 - 20 of 318

Your search for posts with tags containing manners found 318 posts

A visit to London

Six plates with titles: London from Camberwell (on the South). Blackfriar’s Bridge [illegible]. The menagerie in the Tower. Westminister Bridge, Hall, & Abbey. London Bridge & the monument. The Juvenile Library.   Author: S. W., active...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 11 May 2021

“Representing the General and Committees as a set of idiots”

As I related yesterday, in April 1775 the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety ordered Abijah Brown of Waltham to prepare three cannon for use. Then, about three weeks later, the congress ordered him to deliver those three guns...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2021

From the Long Room to Online Group Tours

Here are a couple more online events coming up this week that caught my eye. On Thursday, 15 April, the Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York will offer “The Long Room: For the Entertainment of Friends and Strangers”, featuring former guest curator...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2021

Looking Back on the Owen Richards Attack

Last December, starting here, I wrote about the tar-and-feathers attack on a Customs employee named Owen Richards in May 1770. The fallout from that event lasted for years, so I’m going to resume the story. But first, for review, here’s the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Apr 2021

“Upon his Interment a large Mob attended”

As I described yesterday, the funeral of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver on 8 Mar 1774 did not go smoothly. Some of Oliver’s close friends and relatives, including his brother, Chief Justice Peter Oliver (shown here), and their in-law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2021

A Funeral Procession for Andrew Oliver

I started this month reviewing the events of early March 1774: the return of the Massachusetts Spy, the death of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver (shown here), John Hancock’s Massacre oration, and the second Boston Tea Party.That wasn’t all. Lt. Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2021

“Adventurous Wives” Conference via Chawton House

Chawton House is an Elizabethan manor once owned by Jane Austen’s brother. It houses the research library of the Centre for the Study of Early Women’s Writing, 1600–1830.In that capacity, Chawton House will host an online conference...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2021

Turtles All the Way Down

This advertisement appeared in the 13 Oct 1761 New-York Gazette.Here are some tasty extracts from Washington biographer Alexis Coe’s conversation with Prof. Mary Draper about the background behind this ad: Mary: In the 18th century, colonists throughout...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2021

A “very Cheerfull” Christmas at the Rowes’

The merchant John Rowe was one of Boston’s leading Anglicans, so he celebrated Christmas while his Congregationalist neighbors generally ignored the holiday. Here’s how Rowe described 25 Dec 1770 in his published diary, 250 years ago today:...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Dec 2020

Van Horn on “The Power of Objects,” Plus a Panel on “Caribbean Connections”

Tonight, on Monday, 30 November, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host an online talk by Jennifer Van Horn on “The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America.” The event description says: Over the course of the eighteenth century,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2020

Abigail Adams’s Quiet Thanksgiving in 1798

On 29 Nov 1798, Abigail Adams sat down to an unusually small Thanksgiving dinner. An autumn Thanksgiving feast was an important tradition in New England, and in October Massachusetts’s governor, Increase Sumner, issued a proclamation naming the...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Nov 2020

Settling the Rev. Mr. Mosley in Pomfret

When the Rev. Richard Mosley arrived in Pomfret, Connecticut, in September 1771, asking about the need for an Anglican minister, Godfrey Malbone was cautious. He certainly needed a minister for the little church he had designed and built himself. For...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Nov 2020

The Committee and Colonel Malbone

When Godfrey Malbone of Pomfret, Connecticut, set up an Anglican church and arranged for the Rev. Richard Mosley to preach there in the fall of 1771, that wasn’t just a matter of religious freedom.It was also a financial matter. Malbone had been...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Nov 2020

“Lost Holiday” Online Talk, 5 Nov.

On Thursday, 5 November, I’ll speak via Boston by Foot on the topic “Lost Holiday: How Colonial Boston Celebrated the Fifth of November.”Our event description: The 5th of November was a milestone in the annual calendar for the youth...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2020

Miss Quincy, Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. Storer, and the Adamses

In the fall of 1761, Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln (shown here, courtesy of the Harvard Art Museums) struck up a correspondence with Abigail Smith, the seventeen-year-old daughter of the minister of Weymouth.At the time, Lincoln was twenty-five years old and...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Oct 2020

Ebenezer Storer, at Your Service

In December 1774, a few months after Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln’s husband Bela died, a Boston merchant named Ebenezer Storer was also widowed.Storer appears here in a pastel portrait rendered by John Singleton Copley in the late 1760s, now at the Metropolitan...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2020

“Dr. Lincoln and his Lady”

Earlier this month I discussed how John Adams, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, and Dr. Bela Lincoln of Hingham competed for the attention of Hannah Quincy in north Braintree.Sometime in the spring of 1759 John wrote that he almost proposed to Hannah, only to...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Oct 2020

The Last Years of Parson Wibird

To answer yesterday’s question, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, minister of the north precinct of Braintree (which became Quincy) never married.Even as he discussed marriage with the parson as another young man attracted to Hannah Quincy, John Adams may...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2020

Bachelors in Braintree

When Anthony Wibird came to Braintree to be the minister of the north parish in 1755, the congregation offered him £80 a year and £120 as a lump sum in “settlement money” when he married.Wibird held out instead for £100 a...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Oct 2020

Page 1 of 16123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.