The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "national identity"

Your search for posts with tags containing national identity found 18 posts

Homesickness: emotions, families, and nations

In a brief visit to Manchester Art Gallery – snatched during a gap in the conference my husband was attending – I was stopped in my tracks by Benoit Aubard’s Homesick (2018). Aubard’s spray-painted graffiti style duvet...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 20 Aug 2019

Interrogating ‘middling culture’: a workshop report

Middling Culture held its first project workshop on Tuesday 25 June 2019. Our team was joined by around 20 experts from different disciplines, including scholars of literature, social and cultural history, archaeology and material culture from both academia...
From: Middling Culture on 5 Jul 2019

'The Banished Man' - Charlotte Smith

‘In losing every thing but my honour and my integrity, I have learned, that he who retains those qualities can never be degraded, however humble may be his fortune.’The Banished Man (1794)Charlotte Smith (1749-1806)If you’ve heard of...

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Histories of the Morris in Britain

25 - 26 March 2017, Cecil Sharp House, 2 Regents Park Road, London NW1 7AYOrganised in partnership by The Historical Dance Society with The English Folk Dance and Song Society and The Morris Ring, The Morris Federation, Open Morris.The focus of the conference...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 25 Mar 2017

October 30

GUEST CURATOR: Ceara Morse What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (October 30, 1766).“Madeira Fish.” In this advertisement certain types of fish were being sold: “Madeira Fish”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Oct 2016

Kirsty McHugh, ‘Manuscript Travel Accounts of Scotland and Wales’

Kirsty McHugh is a first-year doctoral research student at the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies. She is part of the AHRC Curious Travellers project. Here, she adapts her paper from the inaugural CRECS Conference...
From: CRECS// on 31 Jul 2016

Jannat Ahmed, ‘The Men of Regency Romance’

Jannat Ahmed, a third-year English Literature undergraduate at Cardiff University, adapts her paper from the inaugural CRECS Conference for the CRECS blog. Jeffrey Weeks in his book, Sex, Politics and Society (2012: 49), writes: From the 1860s there was...
From: CRECS// on 6 Jun 2016

Sailors, States, and the Bureaucracy of Revolution

Transatlantic commerce was the defining feature of the eighteenth century's imperial economy. The ocean was the conduit by which goods, labour, and capital circulated—goods that included sugar and tobacco, labour that included enslaved men and women,...
From: The Junto on 15 Feb 2016

'The True-Born Englishman. A Satire' - Daniel Defoe

‘A horrid Medly of Thieves and Drones,Who ransack’d Kingdoms, and dispeopl’d Towns. The Pictand Painted Britain, Treach’rous Scot, By Hunger, Theft, and Rapine, hither brought. NorwegianPirates, Buccaneering Danes, Whose red-hair’d...

Report on Cambrian CRECS, 17 Feb 2015

by Jamie Castell and Alison Harvey Cambrian CRECS: Nation, Region, Place in the Long 18th Century was the second event hosted by the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth Century Seminar, and as Six Nations fever gripped the country, we sought to consider...
From: CRECS// on 24 Feb 2015

Killing the King with Porter: Freedom of expression in 1794

On Tuesday morning, I found myself sitting in a pub in London and repeatedly blowing the foam off a pot of porter while somebody filmed me and a gaggle of curious regulars looked on. Academia has often taken me to some rather unexpected places, but this...
From: CRECS// on 22 Feb 2015

Our next event Cambrian CRECS is on this Tuesday!

Filed under: Events Tagged: debates, eighteenth century, Felicia Hemans, fiction, King Arthur, national identity, nineteenth century, poetry, Romanticism, Wales
From: CRECS// on 13 Feb 2015

Next event—Cambrian CRECS: Nation, Region, Place in the Long 18th Century, 17 Feb 2015

Gripped by Six Nations fever? Wondering which team will walk triumphant from the grassy field of combat in March? And can Wales recoup last week’s loss against England and secure their favoured status once again? Well, CRECS can’t provide...
From: CRECS// on 13 Feb 2015

CFP: BARS 2015 Conference—Romantic Imprints (16–19 July 2015, Cardiff)

The BARS 2015 website will shortly be going live, but in the meanwhile, we’re posting the 2nd Call for Papers. 2nd Call for Papers: Romantic Imprints British Association for Romantic Studies, 14th International Conference Cardiff University, 16–19...
From: CRECS// on 20 Jan 2015

The Nation, the Global Game and the Weight of it All

 For the past month, our eyes have been on the ball. Perfectly round, it flies and falls, across stadium skies through fields of grass, past fast, neon shoes and into goals, from Brazil to where we are. Our eyes follow. From Manaus and Fortaleza in the...
From: The Junto on 14 Jul 2014

There be dragons: research outside my expertise

I’m doing some reading on St George, a (probably mythical) Roman martyred for his Christianity in the third or early fourth century, eventually patron saint of England, as well as lots of other countries. This is not my usual field … Continue...
From: Joanne Bailey Muses on History on 7 Oct 2013

Why A Brit Should Teach American Revolutionary History

“There’s just one question I have to ask,” said the pleasant young man at the US Embassy, reviewing my visa application. “You are aware that we won, right?” As a Brit teaching early American history in the USA, I get some version of this question...
From: The Junto on 4 Jul 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.