The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "prose"

Your search for posts with tags containing prose found 11 posts

The Baroness: A Novel (Part II)

By George W.M. Reynolds Originally reprinted in The Monthly Magazine, then incorporated into Master Timothy’s Bookcase. Read Part I. Chapter Three: The Notary The breakfast was at length concluded. The priest retired to his study; the two young...

The Baroness: A Novel (Part I)

By George W.M. Reynolds Chapter One: The Calais Mail It was in the middle of August, 1822, that the epoch of our tale commences.[1] The clock of the General Post Office in Paris had struck the hour of five in the afternoon, and the passengers, who...

The Fatal Glove

In one of the most retired streets of Nuremberg, towards the middle of the seventeenth century, resided the family of Madame Hamel.[1] She had been left a widow at an early age, with a moderate competency; and instead of mingling in the gay scenes of...

March 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The trifling expence of a News Paper.” Colonists did not have to subscribe to newspapers to gain access to their contents.  Some subscribers passed along newspapers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Mar 2020

Prosecuting Homicide on the Coroner’s Inquisition

By Cassie Watson; posted 26 December 2018. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century coroner’s juries regularly returned verdicts that appeared to determine questions of criminal liability, in a parallel yet subtly different process from that conducted...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 26 Dec 2018

“Renaissance Prose: New Directions” – Irish Renaissance Seminar at NUI Galway in May 2018

“Renaissance Prose: New Directions” – a meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar at NUI Galway, Saturday 5th May 2018  1.30pm: Welcome 1.45‐3.15pm: Panel Darrell Jones (NUI Galway): ‘Scribo, ergo mundum est: John...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 13 Feb 2018

‘Writing with Conceited Assurance’: A ‘Lost’ Brontë Fragment

By Grace Moore, The University of Melbourne I’ve never been great at manuscript work. An early-career incident with Charles Dickens’ Hard Times manuscript at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London left me convinced that I would never do...
From: Histories of Emotion on 7 Dec 2017

Prose and Verse in the 1608 King Lear Quarto: An Alternative Explanation

I’ve spent a good deal of time and energy writing about why Brian Vickers’s The One King Lear is such a terribly misguided book — both in an almost endless string of tweets and in a forthcoming long-form essay for the Los Angeles Review...
From: dispositio on 13 Aug 2016

The Collected Prose of T.S. Eliot

Edward Short sent me the link to his latest for The Catholic World Report:It has been more than 50 years since T.S. Eliot died in 1965, and looking back over that period we can see that the decadence he predicted would overtake the West if it chose to...

Visualizing English Print, 1530-1800, Genre Contents of the Corpus

Some features of the corpus, visualized here over time. Many of the linguistic and topical trends that we find in this data set will express the state of the corpus at a given moment in time. I have divided up the time series into groups containing...
From: Wine Dark Sea on 12 Dec 2013

Erasmus Darwin and the Threat of Materialism

Henry Fuseli, Drawing for the Frontispiece of Erasmus Darwin’s “The Botanic Garden.” Alternate Title: Flora Attired by the Elements. Graphite on slightly textured, cream laid paper. Sheet (sight): 8 3/4 x 6 3/8 inches (22.2 x 16.2 cm)....

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.