The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "research"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1385

Your search for posts with tags containing research found 1385 posts

Kress Fellowships at the Medici Archive Project

The Medici Archive Project in Florence, Italy, is offering two Samuel H. Kress Fellowships for graduate students interested in pursuing archival research at the Archivio di Stato di Firenze and other Florentine archives. These fellowships offer American...

Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire – A Review

Ollivier Hubert and François Furstenberg, eds., Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2020). Adam Nadeau...
From: Borealia on 10 May 2021

“Flaneuring” through a morning: more research joys

It has been so long since I posted here I couldn’t figure out how to do it. My last post was at the end of October of last year, so close to six months ago. It feels more like a year to me, in part because of our molassas-slow new reality. That...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Apr 2021

The Fury of the Betrayed: What Attacks on Capitols in Montreal (1849) and Washington (2021) Tell Us About the Long History of Anti-Democratic Sentiment in North American Political Culture

Dan Horner On the night of April 25, 1849, a riled-up crowd of protesters showered Montreal’s parliament building with rocks, stormed through its front doors, and set the building—a repurposed public market in the city’s west-end—on...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2021

Burton on Ptolemy

Ptolemy’s authorship of the Ὁ Καρπός (the Centiloquium) has been rejected for the last 120 years or so, since Franz Boll argued concisely that it couldn’t be by Ptolemy.[1] Who originally composed the work...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Apr 2021

Around the Table: Publisher Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Karen Merikangas Darling, an Executive Editor in the Books Division at the University of Chicago Press, about the process of publishing recipes-related research. Thank...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Apr 2021

La Nouvelle-France, une société du « long Moyen Âge » ? Partie

Arnaud Montreuil Peut-il être intéressant pour les historiens de la Nouvelle-France et du Early Canada de comparer la société néofrançaise à la société médiévale ? Dans le billet...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”? Part

Arnaud Montreuil  Could it be interesting for historians of New France and early Canada to compare New French society to medieval society? In the first part of this post, I suggested that this might be the case, and that this avenue deserves to be...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”?

Arnaud Montreuil With the arrival of the first explorers, then as settlers began to claim land, medieval West burgeoned in the Americas.[1] This is the idea put forward by historian Jérôme Baschet in a series of works, including his book...
From: Borealia on 15 Mar 2021

La Nouvelle-France, une société du « long Moyen Âge » ?

Arnaud Montreuil Avec l’arrivée des premiers explorateurs, puis à mesure que se consolide la colonisation, c’est l’Occident médiéval qui prend place en Amérique[1]. Telle est l’idée défendue...
From: Borealia on 15 Mar 2021

Around the Table: Museum Chat

Welcome to the latest Around the Table! Today we have a chat about the recipes-related collections at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., especially the National Museum of American History (NMAH)! I am delighted to speak with Ashley Rose...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Mar 2021

New Digital Humanities Techniques Open Locked Letters

Early modern writers sometimes employed letterlocking in order to close letters securely using complex practices of folding, cutting, inserting tabs, and sewing. The New York Times reports: “In an era before sealed envelopes, this technique,...

Histoire et mémoire du régime seigneurial au Québec

Olivier Guimond Benoît Grenier (dir.) (coll. Alain Laberge et Stéphanie Lanthier), Le régime seigneurial au Québec : fragments d’histoire et de mémoire (Sherbrooke, Les Éditions de l’Université...
From: Borealia on 1 Mar 2021

History and memory of the seigneurial regime in Quebec

Olivier Guimond Benoît Grenier, ed. Le régime seigneurial au Québec: fragments d’histoire et de mémoire. In collaboration with Alain Laberge and Stéphanie Lanthier. (Sherbrooke: Les Éditions de l’Université...
From: Borealia on 1 Mar 2021

Who’s Counting?

I am right on the verge of completing my manuscript for submission to the publisher, but I had to stop because something is bothering me and I need to “write it out”. That process describes quite a few of my blog posts, actually. Last week...
From: streets of salem on 22 Feb 2021

4,000 “preliminary” catalog records are better than nothing!

At least, we hope the approximately 24,000 “preliminary records” added to the Folger’s online catalog yesterday are better than nothing, which is what Hamnet had for most of these books since going live in 1997. Today’s Collation...
From: The Collation on 17 Feb 2021

4,000 “preliminary” catalog records are better than nothing!

At least, we hope the approximately 24,000 “preliminary records” added to the Folger’s online catalog yesterday are better than nothing, which is what Hamnet had for most of these books since going live in 1997. Today’s Collation...
From: The Collation on 16 Feb 2021

Did ordinary Italians have a ‘Renaissance’? Discover how artisans lived and connected with culture from my new book!

  Italian Renaissance is known mainly through art works, decorative objects, and fashion manufactures that were owned, used and admired by the high-ranking wealthy elites. Before we started the Refashioning the Renaissance project, few scholars...
From: Refashioning the Renaissance on 1 Feb 2021

Page 1 of 70123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.