The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "robert boyle"

Your search for posts with tags containing robert boyle found 18 posts

The Man Who Liked Books Too Much

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 7 Aug 2020

The Man Who Liked Books Too Much

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 28 Jun 2019

Book Review: An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears

An Instance of the Fingerpost, published in 1998, is a rather large work of historical fiction – 704 pages long! As I had this read aloud to me by my husband whenever we had some free time – which was not often – so it took over a year...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Feb 2019

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 14 Sep 2018

Bitter as Gall or Sickly Sweet? The Taste of Medicine in Early Modern England

Adriaen Brower’s The Bitter Potion (1640) reminds me of the reaction of my three-year-old niece to the taste of a sprout at Christmas! The man’s face is contorted in an expression of deep revulsion to the bitter medicine. The image seems to...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Jan 2018

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 27 Oct 2017

Leviathan and the Broken Air-Pump

What if Shapin and Schaffer’s classic, Leviathan and the Air-Pump were one in a series about the adventures of Rob Boyle, deep-sea explorer and treasure-hunter? Lieutenants S. Shapin and S. Schaffer draw on their experience in the Navy in their...
From: Darin Hayton on 30 May 2017

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.  The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked...
From: Conciatore on 25 Nov 2016

Alex Seltzer on Catesby

From Alex Seltzer – Catesby and physico-theology article published 20 Feb.,2016 Announcing the publication of the following article by Alex Seltzer:  “Catesby’s Conundrums:  mixing representation with metaphor,”  The...

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.  The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was apparently bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri...
From: Conciatore on 4 Nov 2015

“Take Good Syrup of Violets”: Robert Boyle and Historical Recipes

By Rebecca Laroche, in consultation with Steven Turner Some time ago, Steven Turner of the National Museum of American History and I published our discovery that Robert Boyle’s Experiments and Considerations Touching Colours (1664) reflected knowledge...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Apr 2015

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire. The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was apparently bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked...
From: Conciatore on 5 Nov 2014

Great Globs of Glowing Urine

The Alchemist in Search of the Philosophers Stone (1771). Joseph Wright of Derby [Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsMany fields define themselves by specialties. Doctors are not just doctors—they are podiatrists or pediatricians or surgeons. Restaurant...
From: Out of Time on 5 Sep 2014

Art and Alchemy. The Mystery of Transformation (April 5 to August 10, 2014)

Before entering the exhibition, Lawrence M. Principe gave a very brief introduction on alchemy, while art historian Sven Dupré and curator Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk (right to left) expected their turns in the background. Yesterday I went on a pilgrimage...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 16 Jun 2014

Prince Rupert's Drops

Prince Rupert's DropChristopher Merrett, The Art of Glass, 1662, p. 354In 1612, Antonio Neri wrote the first book devoted entirely to the formulation of glass. Titled L'Arte Vetraria, it covers a wide range of glass recipes, colors, enamels and artificial...
From: Conciatore on 18 Dec 2013

A Wee Bit Stroppey

Christopher MerrettGeorge Perfect Harding, (c.1820-50)Antonio Neri's first translator was a London physician named Christopher Merrett. He was an early member of the Royal Society and completed several projects for them. Besides Neri's book, he compiled...
From: Conciatore on 16 Dec 2013

A ‘Hasty Blotted Scribble’: New Boyle Original Discovered

While ferreting around in the archives of Trinity College, Oxford finalizing annotations for Volume IV of The Correspondence of John Wallis, I came across a letter from Robert Boyle, the eminent natural philosopher, to the theologian and physician...

On the “Oil of Swallows”, Part 1: Did anyone actually use these outrageous remedies?

By Michelle DiMeo, with Rebecca Laroche Part of the appeal of old medical remedies is that many are filled with seemingly outrageous ingredients. A recipe “For deaffnesse” attributed to Sir Kenelm Digby, Fellow of the Royal Society, required one to...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Oct 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.