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Your search for posts with tags containing school found 339 posts

For the Teacher: Creating an online high school class project on Northanger Abbey that engages students

The Matthews Project Introduction: Inquiring readers, The teacher who supervised the creation of this project, Ben John Wiebracht, contacted Vic Sanborn of Jane Austen’s World in the summer of 2020 to propose a research project his students would...
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 May 2021

Tea: The Most Normal Thing in the World?

Yaela van Oel, Pieternel Pompe, Pablo Kamsteeg, and Joska BergAlfa Academy Next to water and coffee, tea is the most preferred and imbibed drink on earth. People drink it when they get together, as a moment to calm down or wake up. In this blog we take...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Mar 2021

Mounting Expenses for Four Towns

This posting continues the analysis of a 3 Feb 1775 letter that I started quoting yesterday, from men in four different towns to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety.Yesterday’s extract shows the letter was about eight...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2021

“I was requested by my Father to go to the Stable”

As I described yesterday, in 1791 Duncan Ingraham asked the Massachusetts government to compensate him for property taken from him before the Revolutionary War.Specifically, Ingraham wanted to be paid for “four, four pound iron Cannon of the value...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jan 2021

October 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “MRS. SWALLOW begs Leave to inform the Publick.” Newman Swallow and Mrs. Swallow, presumably husband and wife, both ran newspaper advertisements in late October and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Oct 2020

What are the Similarities between the Rituals Surrounding Coffee and the Rituals Surrounding XTC?

Cathelijne van der Marel and Renate de Groot Alfa Academy Rituals Surrounding Coffee Coffee Moments The ritual of a coffee moment originates from the era of coffeeshops. Coffee was and is very popular, which resulted in a great number of people spending...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Oct 2020

September 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Being much importuned by sundry young men of the carpenter’s business …” Thomas Nevell was “one of colonial Philadelphia’s most prominent...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Sep 2020

L’Ouverture High School: Race, Place, and Memory in Oklahoma

By Erica Johnson Edwards Growing up white in rural Oklahoma, I only had a few Black schoolmates, did not have any Black teachers, and did not learn about the Haitian Revolution. In fact, I only first learned about this world historical event during...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Sep 2020

Exploring Benjamin Lincoln’s Life in Hingham

This afternoon the Hingham Historical Society launches its new season of lectures with the theme “Benjamin Lincoln’s World: Stories from Colonial Hingham to the Early Republic.”The society is in the process of acquiring Gen. Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Sep 2020

September 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The ACADEMY in LEEDS … in England.” Readers of the Newport Mercury likely recognized many or even most of the names that appeared among the advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Sep 2020

September 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “PETER VIANY.  CONTINUES to teach Fencing and Dancing.” Peter Vianey taught dancing and fencing in New York in the late 1760s and early 1770s.  To attract...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Sep 2020

Early American Glass Poem

Note: This is an abbreviated version of a piece appearing in the Autumn/Winter 2016 issue of the NAGC Bulletin. Many thanks for their permission to share it here. A copy of the complete article is available through inter-library loan from the numerous...
From: Conciatore on 4 Sep 2020

“The most appropriate and useful place for the collection”

Yesterday I quoted John Adams’s deed donating his library to the town of Quincy. The former President also granted the town some of the land he owned to build an academy, where the library was supposed to go, and a new Congregational church.In February...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Aug 2020

When John Adams Gave Away His Library

In the summer of 1822, John Adams was feeling generous toward his home town and considering his legacy. The ex-President was then eighty-six years old.On 25 June, Adams deeded to the town of Quincy two tracts of land to fund a stone “Temple”...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2020

‘Don’t Be Ridiculous!’

A ridiculous review of Robin Stevens’ A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery series Robin Stevens, Death Sets Sail (London: Puffin, 2020) Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, schoolgirl detectives in the late 1930s (the Golden Age of both Crime Fiction and...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 18 Aug 2020

Another Boston Town Meeting, “all in very good order”

On 15 May 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians convened in Faneuil Hall for another town meeting session. That gathering was meant to finish up some business from the week before, as discussed starting here, and the year before.The first order of business...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 May 2020

Fire Buckets and the Fenno Family

The Skinner auctioneers blog offers Christopher D. Fox’s detailed discussion of firefighting and leather fire buckets in Boston. In particular, Fox profiles one maker of those buckets:While there were certainly a number of merchants in Boston from...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 May 2020

Studying the Schoolmasters’ Salaries

Toward the end of their 8 May 1770 town meeting, Bostonians turned to approving salaries for the town’s schoolteachers.There were five town schools—two grammar or Latin schools and three writing schools. However, not all the teachers were...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 May 2020

Eating Through the Seasons: Food Education in Japan

By Alexis Agliano Sanborn Seasons have been celebrated in Japanese society for centuries through poetry and prose. During the Edo-period (1603-1868) this appreciation of nature codified in the creation of the saijiki, or, poetic seasonal almanacs. These...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.