The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "slaves"

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Your search for posts with tags containing slaves found 111 posts

How Did John Adams Respond to Abigail’s “Remember the Ladies”?

Women in all states won the universal right to vote one hundred years ago through the ratification of the United States Constitution’s 19th Amendment... The post How Did John Adams Respond to Abigail’s “Remember the Ladies”? appeared...

May 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Negro Boy … can work in the Iron Works, both at Blooming and at Refining.” Advertisements concerning several enslaved men and women ran in the Essex Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 May 2020

“fix an innoculating hospital in their metropolis”

Continuing with posts about epidemics in America during the colonial and early national periods in the age of the coronavirus. Some parents today do not want their children to receive certain vaccinations fearing they may cause conditions like autism....
From: In the Words of Women on 10 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Patrick H. Hannum on Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews military veteran and history professor Patrick H. Hannum on Lord Dunmore’s proclamation to emancipate slaves who joined the... The post This Week on Dispatches: Patrick H. Hannum...

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Valuable PLANTATION … THIRTY VALUABLE NEGROES.” John Rose and Alexander Rose, administrators of the estate “of the deceased Dr. WILLIAM ROSE,” turned...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2020

The Constitution Counted Free Women and Children—And It Mattered

As adopted by the Constitutional Convention, Article I, Section 2, Clause 3 of the Constitution mandated that the population numbers forming the basis for... The post The Constitution Counted Free Women and Children—And It Mattered appeared first...

This Week on Dispatches: Todd Braisted on Discovering Barnard E. Griffiths, Queen’s Ranger, Emancipated Slave

Dispatches can now be easily accessed on the JAR main menu. Host Brady Crytzer discusses historian Todd Braisted’s remarkable discovery of a slave who... The post This Week on Dispatches: Todd Braisted on Discovering Barnard E. Griffiths, Queen’s...

April 3

GUEST CURATOR: Patrick Waters What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? South-Carolina and American General Gazette (May 1, 1769). “NEGROES … from CAPE-MOUNT, on the WINDWARD COAST, which is in the center...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Apr 2019

April 27

GUEST CURATOR: Samantha Surowiec What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 27, 1769).“To be SOLD … before Mr. Anthony Hay’s door, in Williamsburg … TWENTY LIKELY...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Apr 2019

April 23

GUEST CURATOR: Samantha Surowiec What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Georgia Gazette (April 26, 1769). “Brought to the Work House, a TALL STOUT ABLE NEGROE FELLOW … says his name is Michael.”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Apr 2019

April 19

GUEST CURATOR: Matthew Ringstaff What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (April 19, 1769). “ABOUT TWENTY-ONE VALUABLE PLANTATION SLAVES.” On April 19, 1769, Benjamin Fox put an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Apr 2019

December

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Virginia Gazette [Rind] (December 22, 1768). “A SCHEME of a LOTTERY.” Bernard Moore did not specify why he set about “disposing of certain LANDS, SLAVES, and STOCKS”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Dec 2018

Thomas Anson

This is a guest blog written by independent researcher Audrey Dewjee. Audrey has than 40 years of research, mainly examining and unearthing the history of black people in Britain. She collaborated with the project while it was in the research stage, allowing...
From: Runaway Slaves in Britain on 14 Dec 2018

November 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).“About THIRTY VERY LIKELY SLAVES.” Inglis and Hall’s advertisement for “About THIRTY VERY LIKELY SLAVES” ran in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Nov 2018

Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s Cook: A Novel

JAR: In a nutshell, can you give us a basic overview of The General’s Cook? RG: The General’s Cook is about George Washington’s enslaved chef, Hercules,... The post Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s...

October 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (October 19, 1768).“A few new Negroes, will be sold on the most reasonable terms.” The partnership of Cowper and Telfairs repeatedly inserted a list-style...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Oct 2018

“sort of a little biography”

A couple of months ago there was an article in my local paper that described a situation in a nearby middle school. The social studies teacher had included creating a newspaper advertisement for a runaway slave as one of the independent activities available...
From: In the Words of Women on 27 Aug 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.