The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "speaking"

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Your search for posts with tags containing speaking found 155 posts

History Camp America 2021 and Other Conferences to Enjoy

I’ve been presenting at and enjoying History Camp Boston since 2014 (as shown here). Last year the pandemic stopped this conference from happening. This year, the prospect of traveling and gathering is still uncertain, though the situation is looking...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Apr 2021

Evacuation Day Lecture Now Online

I’ve put “The End of Tory Row,” my Evacuation Day talk for Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters, online at YouTube. Because this was an online talk, I loaded my PowerPoint up with more graphics. I hope those survive...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2021

Three New Interviews

A couple of weeks ago I wore collared shirts and shaved almost every day of the week.That’s because I was scheduled to participate a series of online conversations that were recorded for viewing. First, I spoke with Bob Allison and Jonathan Lane...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2021

“The End of Tory Row” Online, 11 March

On the evening of Thursday, 11 March, I’ll offer an online presentation for the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site about “The End of Tory Row.”For the past several years, I’ve spoken about...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2021

Losing Sight of William Molineux—Live Chat

From the Transactions of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts: A Stated Meeting of the Society was held at the house of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, No. 28 Newbury Street, Boston, on Thursday, January 28, 1926, at three o’clock in...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2021

Ad Astra Podcast

For scholars working on the history of astrology, The Astra Project is the wonderful resource and community of experts. The two people who seem to be the most public faces of the project are Helena Avelar and Luís Campos Ribeiro. The project also...
From: Darin Hayton on 3 Feb 2021

A Chat with D. Brenton Simons

Last month I had the pleasure of chatting on video with D. Brenton Simons, president of the New England Historical and Genealogical Society, and Christian Di Spigna, author of Founding Martyr. The conversation, set up by the Dr. Joseph Warren Historical...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jan 2021

Atlas of Boston History Wins Historic New England Book Prize

Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities) has awarded its 2020 Book Prize to The Atlas of Boston History, edited by Nancy S. Seasholes and written by her and a bevy of contributors, including me. The society...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2020

Peeking in on Pope Night in 177

Earlier this fall, Boston 1775 reader David Churchill Barrow asked me what Pope Night was like in Boston in 1770, 250 years ago today.After all, that loud, political, and occasionally violent 5th of November holiday fell in between the first two trials...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Nov 2020

“Lost Holiday” Online Talk, 5 Nov.

On Thursday, 5 November, I’ll speak via Boston by Foot on the topic “Lost Holiday: How Colonial Boston Celebrated the Fifth of November.”Our event description: The 5th of November was a milestone in the annual calendar for the youth...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2020

“Finding a Voice without the Vote” Panel, 29 Oct.

On Thursday, 29 October, I’ll be part of an online panel discussion on “Finding a Voice without the Vote: 18th Century,” presented by Revolutionary Spaces, custodian of the Old South Meeting House and Old State House in Boston.“In...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Oct 2020

Conversations to Watch and Texts to Read

At the start of the month I participated in a couple of online conversations recorded for history.First was the “Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather: Race, Religion, and the Press in Colonial America” organized by the Freedom Forum. This was part...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Oct 2020

“Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather” Program, 1 Oct.

On Thursday, 1 October, I’ll be part of an online discussion through the Freedom Forum on “Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather: Race, Religion, and the Press in Colonial America.” The Freedom Forum’s description says:The third program...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Sep 2020

“When Washington Went to War at Sea” at Historic Beverly, 14 Sept.

On Monday, 14 September, I’ll deliver an online presentation through Historic Beverly on “When Washington Went to War at Sea: How Beverly Became the General’s Naval Base.” Our teaser:In the fall of 1775, Gen. George Washington...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Sep 2020

How I Zoomed My Summer Vacation

It’s the part of August in New England when the sky is overcast, the air has a chill, and hurricanes sometimes pass by. Back when I was growing up, my family always managed to be on a New Hampshire lakeside during that week, shivering in sweaters...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Aug 2020

“Massachusetts Revolts!” at HistoryAuthorTalks, 4 Aug.

On Tuesday, 4 August, I’ll participate in an online conversation on the theme “Massachusetts Revolts!: How the Feisty New England Protests Changed the World.”This event is the latest digital discussion among historians to be organized...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jul 2020

“America’s Summer Road Trip,” 1 Aug.

When History Camp Boston and then other History Camps had to be canceled this year because of the pandemic, the organizers of The Pursuit of History looked for another way to share historical information with the public. Lee Wright and Carrie Lund have...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jul 2020

Perspectives on Boston’s 1764 Smallpox Epidemic

On 13 Apr 1764, John Adams sent his fiancée Abigail a story about being inoculated against smallpox in Boston. Through a cousin of Abigail’s, Dr. Cotton Tufts, Adams and his brother had received a referral to Dr. Nathaniel Perkins. At first...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2020

Online Events and Videos While We Stay Home

With the pandemic, almost every historical site, museum, and society that hosted events has now pivoted to organizing and promoting online events. Sometimes that means an interview with a historian or other expert at home, produced over a platform like...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2020

Prepping for Patriots’ Day 2020 Online

The anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord is coming up on 19 April, so I’ll shift topics (mostly) from the Sestercentennial of the reaction to the Boston Massacre to the opening of the Revolutionary War.Of course, right now we’re...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.