The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "tea"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1520

Your search for posts with tags containing tea found 1520 posts

Texas Legislators Exert Influence over Social Science Teaching

Conservative legislators in Texas are waging a new fight in the so-called “culture wars” over historical memory and public education in the State of Texas. Jim Grossman, Executive Director of the American Historical Association, writes:...

Bahne on “Cradle of Liberty,” 5 May

For folks intrigued by Ens. Henry DeBerniere’s map of the Massachusetts countryside in early 1775, I hope you caught the comments from Charles Bahne about it—particularly sites I couldn’t identify. In addition to being a practiced tour...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Apr 2021

Humanities Instructor Position at Interlochen

Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan is hiring a Humanities Instructor. This teaching position in the Humanities might interest recent graduates of the BA or MA in History programs at Northern Illinois University. The History and Social...

Can America Rock Again?

Earlier this month the Washington Post pubished Prof. Paul Ringel’s essay about Schoolhouse Rock, A.B.C.’s interstitial Saturday morning cartoon, and how it handled the nation’s history.Ringel wrote: “Schoolhouse Rock,” the...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Apr 2021

Pre-Modern World History Position

University Laboratory High School in Champaign-Urbana is hiring a high school teacher in pre-modern World History. History graduates of the History and Social Science Secondary Educator Licensure Programs at Northern Illinois University may be interested...

Teaching Renaissance Studies Online

High school teachers have been confronting the difficulties of teaching History and Social Sciences online over the past year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. These subjects are incredibly complicated, requiring the use of images and maps to teach teenage...

Observations on the tea and window act

Author: Twining, Richard, 1749-1824, author. Title: Observations on the tea and window act, and on the tea trade / by Richard Twining. Edition: The third edition. Publication: London : Printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand, MDCCLXXXV [1785] Catalog...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Apr 2021

Object Lessons: Co-Creating an Exhibition with School Pupils and the German Maritime Museum

One ear-achingly chilly day in February 2020, forty-odd pupils from secondary schools in Oldenburg and Neu Wulmsdorf, three teachers and I descended on the German Maritime Museum (DSM) in Bremerhaven. Our mission? To explore the museum’s extensive...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 1 Apr 2021

Windows into the Past

With warmer weather and the completion of my manuscript, I’ve been out on the Salem streets more, but every time I’m on a lovely walk I see some horrible structure that makes me run home: it’s not just the new big buildings but also...
From: streets of salem on 27 Mar 2021

Renaissance Teaching Award for High School Teachers

The Renaissance Society of America is offering a new award for innovative teaching of Renaissance studies during the Covid-19 pandemic. The award aims to recognize high school teachers and educators who teach Renaissance studies to high school students....

The Aftermath of the Second Boston Tea Party

Yesterday I discussed the political effect of the second Boston Tea Party in London. Today I’ll wrap up this topic with a look at the ripples from the event in Massachusetts. Five local men were linked to the shipment of tea on the Fortune. All...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

A Great Tea-Drinking: Collective Memory and Victorian Invalid Cookery

By Bonnie Shishko Midway through Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1853), Esther Summerson relinquishes her beloved role as adopted housekeeper and assumes another: sick nurse. In a tense scene that’s painfully relevant in this era of COVID,...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Mar 2021

Call for Papers for “The Meaning of Independence,” October 2021

The David Center for the American Revolution at the American Philosophical Society has issued a call for papers for a conference on “The Meanings of Independence” scheduled for 21-22 October in Philadelphia. The call says: The conference aims...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Mar 2021

“Whereas Tea is an Indian Plant…”

Yesterday I quoted a couple of press reports and a diary entry showing how Bostonians used the trope of “Indians” to discuss the men who dumped tea in the harbor, both in December 1773 and March 1774.Another document of that sort was printed...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Mar 2021

“King of the Narragansett tribe of Indians”?

The second Boston Tea Party cemented the “Indian disguises” aspect of the events. On the morning after the Fortune arrived in Boston harbor, the report in Edes and Gill’s radical Boston Gazette ended by saying: The SACHEMS must have...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2021

Tales of the Second Boston Tea Party?

Boston’s first tea crisis lasted two months. The town heard about East India Company tea coming to certain merchants by 18 October, when the Boston Gazette published the news. The men and boys who destroyed that tea headed home late at night on...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Mar 2021

“Emptied and threw the Tea into the Water”

On Sunday, 6 Mar 1774, as described yesterday, the brig Fortune carried 28 1/2 chests of tea into Boston harbor, along with “Gun-Powder, Duck and Hemp.” “The next day,” Gov. Thomas Hutchinson wrote, “the vessel was haled...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2021

“Chests of Bohea tea consigned to several persons”

At three o’clock in the afternoon of Sunday, 6 Mar 1774, Bostonians were jolted by the arrival of the brig Fortune.More specifically, people were jolted by the news that that ship was carrying chests of tea. This was about ten weeks after the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Mar 2021

How to Read Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

An introduction to the twentieth century’s most beautiful novel — with a simple plot but an astonishingly complex, even disorienting style. Ten characters spend two ordinary days, ten years apart, at a summer cottage in the western isles of...
From: Michael Ullyot on 5 Mar 2021

Page 1 of 76123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.