The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "three ladies of london"

Your search for posts with tags containing three ladies of london found 8 posts

The Woman in the Moon: Interviews with the Cast

During rehearsals for James Wallace’s The Dolphin’s Back production of John Lyly’s The Woman in the Moon (Shakespeare’s Globe, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) back in August 2017, we had time to catch up with a few of the cast...
From: Before Shakespeare on 14 Dec 2017

Audiences, Immigration, and Belonging: Strangers in Finsbury

On the 19th November 2017, the TIDE project and Before Shakespeare are hosting a workshop exploring the diverse audiences of Elizabethan playhouses and their surrounding neighbourhoods, based at the University of Liverpool’s London campus, 33 Finsbury...
From: Before Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2017

Venus’s Palaces

She’s got it,Yeah baby, she’s got it—Shocking Blue For 1570s and 1580s theatregoers, love was all around. One of the defining characteristics of the earliest surviving commercial plays is the predominance of the character Venus or her...
From: Before Shakespeare on 4 Oct 2017

Generic excitement

Give ear, I pray you, and mark it attentively, for you shall hear the tenor of a strange and tragical comedy. Anthony Munday, Zelauto (1580) Genre: what is it, what does it mean, and how does it organise our experiences in the theatre, in a book or in...
From: Before Shakespeare on 27 Apr 2017

Birthday Post: A Year of Before Shakespeare

We launched our website last year, on the date of Shakespeare’s 400th anniversary, with an introduction to the project and something of a provocation in Andy’s post about putting the Shhhh into Shakespeare…. The comments that followed...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Apr 2017

The Three Ladies of London and Red Lion workshop, 22 January 2017

Our handout from the event can be downloaded here: three-ladies-and-rl-workshop-handout and photos can be found at Media > Workshops. Our first workshop with The Dolphin’s Back took place yesterday (22 January 2017), exploring...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Jan 2017

“Rent must be paid, duties dischargd”: A Note on Elizabethan Landlords

While estate agents and others expressed disapproval, others will have welcomed this morning’s leaked announcement from the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement about announcing a crackdown on letting fees: those administration...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Nov 2016

Wilson’s “Three Lords and Three Ladies of London” at Purdue

Date: Tuesday, June 2nd, at 7:30 PM Location: The Mallett Theatre in the Pao Hall of Visual and Performing Arts at Purdue University. Cost: Free! No tickets are required, but the venue only seats approximately 100 to 150 people. Come early and...
From: Early Modern Workshop on 20 May 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.