The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "translation"

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Your search for posts with tags containing translation found 133 posts

Working with Translations in the History of Political Thought

The Europa regina from Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia (C16th).   As part of my project on ‘English republican ideas and translation networks in early modern Germany’, I look at the ways in which ideas from the English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 May 2021

Defending the English Revolution in the German Lands

A German translation of Marchamont Nedham’s True state of the case of the Commonwealth (1654). In his study of the contemporary reception of the English Revolution in the German-speaking lands of continental Europe, Günter Berghaus stresses...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 29 Mar 2021

Workshop: ‘Ideas and translation in early modern Europe’, Newcastle, 22 April

As part of my Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship I am organising my first little workshop at Newcastle University to bring together historians and literary scholars with cognate interests in the area of translation and ideas transfer. It is intended as...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 28 Feb 2021

February 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “All ADVERTISEMENTS … translated gratis.” Henry Miller (Johann Heinrich Muller) printed the Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote from January 1762 through...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Feb 2021

What Germans made of the English Revolution

The Works of John Milton in an C18th edition held at Leipzig University. Library. I know, it does not seem the best time to start a new research project in the midst of a pandemic. To begin with, many libraries and archives are still shut or operating...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 9 Dec 2020

The Magic of Socotran Aloe

By Shireen Hamza “The people of this island are without faith — and they are strong magicians. They originate from Greece.” What? I had been flipping through Ikhtiyārāt-i Badī‘ī, a Persian pharmaceutical manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2020

Coleridge’s Colouring?

I am currently making notes on S T Coleridge’s Notebooks, and am using this mini-blog to record an interesting titbit as WordPress allows me to strikethrough a word where Twitter wouldn’t (or at least my technical skills failed me). The Notebooks...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 13 Oct 2020

A coaching inn in Augsburg

Choosing a cover image for a book is tricky, especially on an early modern subject. Ideally, the image should relate both to the title and contents of the book and be available on one of the standard image sites. Since my book is entitled The English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 22 Aug 2020

Revisiting Diana Luft’s Treating the Stone in Sixteenth-Century Wales

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Diana Luft on a sixteenth-century recipe against the stone ascribed to a certain Vicar of Gwenddwr, Wales. The recipe is in Welsh, but includes names of some ingredients in English, perhaps indicating...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 May 2020

A ‘Taste’ of Voltaire

Roseanne Silverwood has just received an MA in Translation (French and Spanish) from the University of Bristol (with distinction). Her dissertation project was to translate Voltaire’s article Goût from Questions sur l’Encyclopédie into...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Apr 2020

New site: the Deleuze Seminars

This exciting new project from Purdue University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France includes English translations of some of Deleuze’s Spinoza seminars. Read on for more info!   The Deleuze...
From: Spinoza Research Network on 1 Apr 2020

CfP: “Translation and Transformation in the Medieval and Early Modern World” – Borderlines XXIV

Borderlines XXIV “Translation and Transformation in the Medieval and Early Modern World” Postgraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies 27-29th March 2020 University College Cork   University College Cork is delighted to...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 6 Dec 2019

Ceci n’est pas Candide…

Translating Voltaire: past and present In his study of Voltaire and England (1976), André-Michel Rousseau gives Voltaire’s contemporary translators short shrift. He dismisses most English translations of the contes out of hand. They are ‘platement...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 31 Oct 2019

A small workshop shows why I like the EU and Brexit is a bad idea

Our Translating Cultures group in the HAB’s Bibelsaal. I have just returned from our annual workshop on Translating Cultures at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel (HAB, Germany) which is always a great opportunity to catch up with...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Oct 2019

Exploring multilingual digital editions

The Taylor Institution Library recently launched a new course teaching digital editing, with students able to create digital editions in any language of their choice. I was delighted to be able to contribute by designing the accompanying website on which...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Apr 2019

“Daily Recipes for Home Cooking” (1924)

Nathan Hopson This is the second in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. Imagine a national cookbook. What would that look like? What would it say about the values and ideology of the society...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Apr 2019

January 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Wochentliche Pennsylvanische Staatsbote (January 24, 1769). “All ADVERTISEMENTS to be inserted in this Paper … are by him translated gratis.” The Adverts 250...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jan 2019

The “Nutrition Song”: Imperial Japan’s Recipe for National Nutrition

Nathan Hopson This is the first in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. In May 1922, Japan’s preeminent nutritionist, Saiki Tadasu, released a recording of his “Nutrition Song,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Jan 2019

Translation as a Way of Life

Enter a captionMy essay on my experiences with translating has just appeared, open access, in Isis, the journal of the History of Science Society.
From: Anita Guerrini on 10 Jan 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.