The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "trials"

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Your search for posts with tags containing trials found 147 posts

Property Rites: How ‘modern’ is the story of Mary Ashford?

As a warning to female virtue, and a humbleMonument to female chastity,This stone marks the grave ofMARY ASHFORD,Who, in the 20th year of her age,Having incautiously repaired to aScene of amusement, without proper protection,Was brutally violated and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 27 Apr 2021

Highway Robbery at Highbury: The Murder of PC Daly in 184

By Cassie Watson; posted 30 December 2020. English legal records include information about the service experiences of thousands of law officers of all ranks, from eighteenth-century excisemen and parish constables to Victorian beat constables and Edwardian...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 30 Dec 2020

The Well of Loneliness on trial: the government vs Radclyffe Hall

On November 9, 1928 Bow Street Magistrates Court was crowded. DH Lawrence’s The Rainbow had been successfully prosecuted for obscenity in the same courtroom 13 years earlier. Now it was the turn of The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall. The perceived...
From: Mathew Lyons on 21 Dec 2020

The Trials of Allegiance

The Trials of Allegiance: Treason, Juries, and the American Revolution by Carlton F. W. Larson (New York : Oxford University Press, 2019) Whether you describe the... The post The Trials of Allegiance appeared first on Journal of the American...

Witch City: the Film and the Moment

It seems ridiculous, but when I moved to Salem I remember being surprised at the extent of Halloween hoopla and kitsch in the city: it seemed really tacky to me but not particularly concerning. It was the early 1990s, I was still in graduate school, and...
From: streets of salem on 13 Oct 2020

Coventry’s Act and Malicious Injury

By Cassie Watson; posted 29 September 2020. On Tuesday 20 December 1670 the House of Commons adjourned until the New Year, but MPs were unaware that one of their number had been singled out for special attention by members of the king’s household....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 29 Sep 2020

Salem Women of Note, 1939

The very last time I was up at the Peabody Essex Museum’s Phillips Library in Rowley, last February I believe, I requested a folder within which was the transcript of a short paper given at a meeting of the Zonta Club of Salem in 1939 by Annie Balcomb...
From: streets of salem on 5 Sep 2020

A Victorian View of Salem Witchcraft

I had not thought about the prolific and pioneering author Harriet Martineau (1802-1876) for years: until I encountered a portrait of her by the Salem artist Charles Osgood in the Catalog of Portraits at the Essex Institute (1936). I was looking...
From: streets of salem on 29 Aug 2020

If We Can’t Picture Them, Were They There?

We don’t have any portraits of Salem women before the eighteenth century: the (European) women of Salem’s (European) founding century are therefore difficult to picture. We are left with nineteenth- and early twentieth-century romanticized...
From: streets of salem on 30 May 2020

A County in Crisis, 169

The twitter tagline for Hub History’s podcast on the Boston witch trials in the mid-seventeenth century was a bit on the edge for me: The Salem Witch Trials? So mainstream. Boston was hanging women for imaginary crimes BEFORE it was cool. Yet...
From: streets of salem on 7 Oct 2019

The Witchfinder in Salem

As tragic and interesting as the Salem Witch Trials are, they are still somewhat limited in the scope of characters and duration. So in the constant and evolving effort to market anything and everything about them, a bit of cultural appropriation always...
From: streets of salem on 3 Oct 2019

Very Serious Pecuniary Loss and Inconvenience: A Jury’s Plea

By Cassie Watson; posted 22 September 2019. The trial of the notorious Rugeley Poisoner, William Palmer, opened at London’s Central Criminal Court, the Old Bailey, on Wednesday 14 May 1856. When it concluded two weeks later the formidable prosecution...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 22 Sep 2019

The Forest through the Trees

COURT HOUSES: constant scenes of dramatic Salem history, from the seventeenth century until today. At present, we have one court house being demolished, one recently refurbished in spectacular fashion, and two long sitting vacant, waiting for their redevelopment...
From: streets of salem on 19 Sep 2019

A North Country transfer

“Trotter walks off from the Bank of England with two sacks under his arm, one inscribed ‘I[ciphers obscured]000 Newland, appearing in the doorway (left), hurries after him, saying, “Hollo sir – where are you going with those bags!”...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Mar 2019

BBC History: The 1603 trial of Walter Ralegh

It is a curious fact that when Sir Walter Ralegh was finally executed – on 29 October 1618 – he had been legally dead for 15 years. Even by 17th-century standards, that was unusual. But then, not many people face the death penalty twice in...
From: Mathew Lyons on 31 Jan 2019

The Stage review: Ralegh: The Treason Trial

Before its run in the Sam Wanamaker Theatre beginning 24 November, Oliver Chris’ staging of Sir Walter Ralegh’s treason trial had several performances in the Great Hall in Winchester, where the trial itself was held on 17 November 1603. Ralegh...
From: Mathew Lyons on 31 Jan 2019

A faithful representation of the trial ….

“A realistic view of the House receding in perspective to the Throne, above which is inset an oval bust portrait of Bartolomo Bergami, wearing a cluster of five decorations, see British Museum Satires no. 13810. Some figures and objects have numbers...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 28 Jan 2019

Slaves in the Hunt House

There were two prompts for today’s post, both of which came as I was getting ready for the spring semester, after a productive sabbatical in which I thought and wrote very little about Salem’s history. The first prompt was the wonderful recognition...
From: streets of salem on 8 Jan 2019

Honour to the defenders of innocence & the rights of the nation

A pot lid with a transfer print showing the figure of Justice in the center with outstretched arms holding laurel wreaths over two lists on either side naming the members of the House of Lords who voted for her acquittal. Title: Honour to the defenders...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Jan 2019

Prosecuting Homicide on the Coroner’s Inquisition

By Cassie Watson; posted 26 December 2018. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century coroner’s juries regularly returned verdicts that appeared to determine questions of criminal liability, in a parallel yet subtly different process from that conducted...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 26 Dec 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.